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Quest Program 2020

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Title:
Quest Program 2020
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SUNY Oswego
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SUNY Oswego
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Subjects / Keywords:
Scott Furlong
Kristen C. Eichhorn
Laura Spenceley
Shana Vandish
Kelly Dolan
Tiphanie Gonzalez
Matthew Baker
Marybeth DeGroot
Sarah Weisman
Zachary Vickery
Kathryn Johns-Masten
Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee

Notes

Abstract:
The 202 Virtual Quest Program includes a presentation index, list of presentations, list of posters, and a speaker index.
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Collected for SUNY Oswego Institutional Repository by the online self-submittal tool. Submitted by Zach Vickery.
General Note:
Quest is a symposium dedicated to sharing the scholarly and creative pursuits of students, faculty, and staff of the State University of New York at Oswego. It is sponsored by the Division of Graduate Studies, Office of the Provost, the Scholarly and Creative Activities Committee, and the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching.
General Note:
History of Quest- In 1979, The Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee (SCAC), then known as the Faculty Research Committee (FRC), wanted to develop ways to encourage more research on campus. One suggestion was to have a Scholarly Activities at Oswego Conference Day, where faculty could present their research to the campus community. Dr. Helen Daly organized the day and it was decided to call it “Quest” in honor of the College’s “quest for knowledge”. Quest had an impressive 77 presentations that first year. In 1982, the administration knew this would be a successful annual program and canceled classes for the first time to bring additional focus to the event. In 1996, Quest was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Daly, who died in 1995, because she took the concept of Quest and turned it into an annual tradition that celebrates campus-wide scholarly and creative activity. Today Quest is a mix of students, faculty, staff and campus-wide presentations with more than 350 participants.
General Note:
Purpose of Quest 2020-The purposes of this conference are the following: -to recognize students, faculty, and staff engaged in scholarly and creative activities at SUNY Oswego, -to encourage and share scholarly and creative efforts across disciplines, -to identify the faculty-led student research taking place on campus

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SUNY Oswego
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— 2020 — VIRTUAL QUEST digitallibrary.oswego.edu/quest Quest Explore. Create. Learn.

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1 en-USWelcome to Questen-USWelcome to SUNY Oswego’s Virtual 2020 Quest event through Oswego’s en-US Digital Library. This virtual symposium provides an opportunity for our en-US campus to come together and celebrate Oswego students’ scholarly and en-US creative works from our remote locations. It highlights what is best en-US about an Oswego education by showcasing our students’ best works en-US and how our faculty support these tremendous efforts even during en-US challenging times.en-US I encourage you to support your friends and colleagues that are engaging en-US in this year’s digital experience and take the opportunity to explore the en-US variety of presentations. Spend some time not only searching for people en-US from your own academic unit, but also engage and embrace the range en-US of topics and elds presented from across all our schools and colleges. en-US Thanks to all who have persevered and participated in this year’s digital en-US Quest experience. I appreciate your commitment to our educational en-US endeavors and SUNY Oswego traditions.en-US Scott R. Furlong, en-US Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs, SUNY Oswego

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2 2 Presentation Index Anthropology þ Page # en-USAnthropology Capstone I þ. .......................................................................... en-US4 en-US Anthropology Capstone Ii þ. ......................................................................... en-US4en-US en-US Anthropology Capstone Iii þ. ........................................................................ en-US4en-US en-US Anthropology Capstone Iv þ. ........................................................................ en-US4en-US en-US Anthropology Capstone V þ. ......................................................................... en-US4en-US Art and Design þ Page # en-USDepartment of Art and Design Showcase þ. ................................................ en-US5en-US Biological Sciences þ Page # en-USBiochemical Analysis of Browning Activities in Apples þ. ............................. en-US5en-US en-US ...................5 en-USC omparing Male Northern Cardinal Plumage en-US en-US Color Between Rural and Urban Habitats þ. ................................................. en-US5en-US en-US Multiple Years of Manual Cattail Removal Slows the en-US en-US Expansion of an Invasive Cattail in a Sensitiveen-US en-US Central New York Fen þ. ................................................................................ en-US5en-US en-US Using Your Head! Finite Element Analysis of en-US en-US Head-First Burrowing Pygopodid Geckos þ. ................................................. en-US5en-US en-US Isolation and Identication of Digenean en-US en-US Parasites from Freshwater Snails in Rice Creek þ. ......................................... en-US6en-US en-US Strategies for Cost Eective Production of Transgenic Miceen-US ......................en-US6en-US en-US Building an Inexpensive Electroporator to en-US en-US Transform Dictyostelium Discoideum þ. ....................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Genetic Interaction Between Adhesion Regulators Rap1en-US en-US and Kinase þ. ................................................................................................ en-US6en-US en-US Responsive to Stress B in Dictyostelium Discoideum þ. ................................ en-US6en-US en-US The Early Life of Asa Gray in Central New York: America’sen-US en-US Greatest Botanist, Darwin’s Friend, and Evolution Advocate þ. .................... en-US6en-US en-US Microplastic Recovery from Lake Ontario en-US en-US Chinook and Coho Salmon þ. ........................................................................ en-US6en-US en-US Correlation Between Limb Length and Patterns of Stressen-US en-US in the Skull of Burrowing Skinks þ. ............................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Eects of Surface Composition on Dictyostelium Adhesionen-US en-US and Mechanosensation þ. ............................................................................. en-US6en-US Chemistry þ Page # en-USMeasuring Peripheral Testosterone and en-US en-US its Relation to Digit Ratio and Sexual Behavior þ. ......................................... en-US6en-US en-US Inhibition of Yeast Growth by Hop Extracts þ. .............................................. en-US6en-US en-US Eects of Heavy Metals on Cardiovascular Healthen-US en-US in Children: Mediational Analysis þ. .............................................................. en-US7en-US en-US Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds fromen-US en-US Indoor Air Using House Plants þ. ................................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Analysis of Diphenhydramine (Dph) in Urineen-US en-USUsing Dispersive Liquid Liquid Microextraction þ. ........................................ en-US7en-US en-US Analysis of Chemically Modied Silica Gel Using en-US en-US Nmr Spectroscopy and Sem þ. ...................................................................... en-US7en-US en-US Crystallization of the Lectin-Like Domain of Thrombomodulin þ. ................ en-US8en-US en-US An Investigation of the Function of Enzyme 3l1w þ. ..................................... en-US8en-US en-US Developing in Vitro Crispr-Cas9 System Techniqueen-US en-US to Target Invader Dna þ. ............................................................................... en-US8en-US en-US Determining the Function of Enzyme 3dl1 þ. ............................................... en-US8en-US en-US Multicomponent Synthesis of 1,4-Disubstituted-1,2,3-Triazolesen-US en-US Using N-(Phenyl)-N-2-Pyridyl Urea as Ligands þ. ......................................... en-US9en-US en-US Synthesis and Characterization of a Bimetallic Complexen-US ...........................en-US9en-US en-US Ru(Ii) Complexes for Aqueous Nitrile Hydrationen-US ........................................en-US9en-US en-US Investigating Photoemissive Properties of Copper Cubanes þ. ..................... en-US9en-US Communication Studies þ Page # en-USCurrent Issues in Media Law þ. ................................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Challenge Debate With Suny Brockport þ. .................................................. en-US10en-US en-US Gender and Race in the Media þ. ................................................................ en-US10en-US en-US Showcasing Student-Designed Communication en-US en-US Research Projects þ. .................................................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Strategic Communication Research þ. ........................................................ en-US10en-US en-US The Impact of Smart Phones on Teenagers þ. ............................................. en-US10en-US Computer Science þ Page # en-USFindingve Story Store Development and Implementation þ. ................. en-US11en-US en-US Transition A Prize Winning Hackathon Project to Create a en-US en-US Wholesome Environment for People to Gain a Deeper en-US en-US Understanding of Their Gender Identities and Sexual Orientation þ. ......... en-US11en-US en-US A Collaborative Robot Coordination System Based on Xbee þ. ................... en-US11en-US en-US Remote Presentation þ. .............................................................................. en-US11en-US en-US Video Game Challenge þ. ............................................................................ en-US11en-US Creative Writing Program þ Page # en-US52nd Annual Charles F. and Miriam B. Davisen-US en-US Creative Writing Awards þ. ......................................................................... en-US11en-US en-US Elemental Monologues: Earth þ. ................................................................ en-US11en-US Curriculum and Instruction þ Page # en-USSeeing Through Their Eyes þ. ...................................................................... en-US12en-US en-US Instructional Media and Technology: en-US en-US Presentations by Five Visiting Scholars þ. ................................................... en-US12en-US en-US Educational Spaces in International Places: en-US en-US Reections from the London & Benin Programs þ. ..................................... en-US12en-US en-US Benin: Perceptions and Realities þ. ............................................................. en-US13en-US en-US Struggles in Education for All þ. .................................................................. en-US13en-US en-US Optimal School Scheduling for Student Learning þ. ................................... en-US13en-US

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3 Electrical and Computer Engineering þ Pag e # en-USThree Joint Robotic Armen-US ..........................................................................en-US 13en-US en-US High-Voltage Power Supply for Ionic Wind-Driven Systems þ. ................... en-US13en-US en-US Tagbots: Exploring Role Changing and Team Member en-US en-US Identication in a Polymorphic Multi-Robot System þ. .............................. en-US14en-US en-US Automated Home Security þ. ..................................................................... en-US14en-US en-US Smart Gym þ. .............................................................................................. en-US14en-US en-US Smart Lot: Smart Parking With Image Classication þ. .............................. en-US15en-US Health Promotion and Wellness þ Pag e # en-USPrevalence of Food Insecurity Among College Students en-US en-US At a Mid-Atlantic University þ. .................................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Discover Wellness þ. ................................................................................... en-US15en-US History þ Pag e # en-USSenior Seminar in History þ. ....................................................................... en-US15en-US en-US History: Faculty Papers on China þ. ............................................................. en-US15en-US en-US South Asian Sacred Spacesen-US ......................................................................en-US 15en-US Honors þ Pag e # en-USWhat It Means to Be a Refugee in Central New York þ. ............................... en-US15en-US Human Development þ Pag e # en-USHuman Development Capstone Experience þ. ............................................ en-US16en-US Linguistics Program þ Pag e # en-USWorking on the Kiowa Dictionary Project þ. ............................................... en-US16en-US Mathematics þ Pag e # en-USCovers & Perfect Hash Functions þ. ............................................................. en-US16en-US en-US Free Resolutions and Combinatorial Objects þ. .......................................... en-US16en-US Modern Languages and Literatures þ Pag e # en-USModern Languages Honor Societies Induction Ceremonies þ. .................... en-US16en-US en-US Studying Abroad: Getgo Travel Grant Experiences Part Ien-US .........................en-US 16en-US en-US Studying Abroad: Getgo Travel Grant Experiences Part Ii þ. ........................ en-US16en-US Oce of International Education and Programs þ Pag e # en-USGet Uncomfortable: How to Overcome Fearen-US en-US and Culture Shock Abroaden-US .......................................................................en-US 17en-US Philosophy þ Pag e # en-USWhat are Theoretical Entities? þ. ................................................................ en-US17en-US Physics þ Pag e # en-USTransition Metal Doped Quantum Dots for en-US en-US Photovoltaic Applications þ. ....................................................................... en-US17en-US en-US The Hydrogen Ionization Front and Stellar Photosphereen-US en-US Interaction in Radially Pulsating Variable Stars þ. ...................................... en-US17en-US en-US Fabry-Perot Interferometer in Laser Spectroscopy Applicationsen-US .............en-US 17en-US en-US Measuring the Hyperne Splittings of Rubidium 5p3/2en-US en-US Excited State Using Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy þ. ........................ en-US18en-US en-US Investigating the Nature of the Hydrogen Ionizationen-US en-US Front in Classical Cepheids þ. ...................................................................... en-US18en-US en-US Magnetic Levitation þ. ................................................................................ en-US18en-US Political Science þ Pag e # en-USCan’t We All Get Along? Finding Common Ground en-US en-US in a Polarized World þ. ................................................................................ en-US18en-US Psychology þ Pag e # en-USMental Imagery and Aphantasia þ. ............................................................ en-US19en-US en-US Mediating Eects of Attachment Style on Traumatic Experience en-US en-US and Psychopathological Symptomatology þ. ............................................. en-US19en-US en-US Resource Constraints on Embodied Human Foraging Behavior þ. .............. en-US19en-US en-US Early Adverse Childhood Experiences and Big Five en-US en-US Personality Traits as Mediators of Emergent en-US en-US Psychopathological Symptomology þ. ....................................................... en-US20en-US en-US Sex Dierences in the Association of Threat Bias and the Amygdala þ. ...... en-US20en-US en-US Utility of Eye Tracking in the Investigation of How en-US en-US Children Resolve Linguistic Ambiguities in the Presence en-US en-US of Classroom Background Noise þ. ............................................................. en-US20en-US en-US Redeveloping and Piloting of A Children’s Social Skills Program þ. ............ en-US21en-US en-US Internet Addiction: Gaming, Social Media, and Role of Personality þ. ........ en-US21en-US School of Business þ Pag e # en-USInternal Carbon Pricing Model At Suny Oswegoen-US ......................................en-US 21en-US en-US Chinese Shadow Banking Operation en-US en-US Mechanism and Risk Transmission þ. .......................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Impression Formation: Interactive Eects of en-USA ttire and Gender on Perceptions of Ethical Behavior þ. ............................. en-US21en-US en-US Warren Buett’s Stock Picking Methodology þ. ......................................... en-US21en-US en-US Evaluation of Graham Manufacturing’s Equity þ. ....................................... en-US21en-US en-US School of Education Teacher Opportunity Corps Ii en-US (Soe Field Placement Oce) þ Pag e # en-USVoices from Toc Ii Scholars: en-US en-US Why Representation Matters, the “Cultureless” Students þ. ...................... en-US22en-US Technology þ Pag e # en-USThe Art of Mechatronics and Manufacturingen-US en-US Technology: A Demonstration þ. ................................................................ en-US22en-US Theatre þ Pag e # en-US‘Acting Shakespeare’ Selections þ. .............................................................. en-US22en-US en-US Research to Performance: Dynamic Devised Plays þ. .................................. en-US22en-US en-US We Band of Prodigals: the ‘Kill Shakespeare’ Live Graphic en-US en-US Novel Process þ. ......................................................................................... en-US en-US22en-US en-US Kill Shakespeare Capstone Presentation þ. ................................................. en-US22en-US en-US “Um, Actually...”: the Dramaturgy of ‘Dungeons and Dragons’ en-US en-US Culture in ‘She Kills Monsters’ þ. ................................................................. en-US23en-US en-US Play Reading: “Most Likely to Succeed” by Sean Patrick Ryan þ. ................ en-US23

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4 Quest 2020 presentationsen-US ANTHROPOLOGYen-USAnthropology Capstone I The Colorism of Black Hair Culture in America Dorcas A folayan Racialization of Accents in the United States: Class and Race implications Emani Blueen-US The Taxonomic and Phylogenetic Classification of the Tarsier (Tarsiiformes) Ha nnah B rown The Anthropology of Sex Education in NY State: The Pubic Hair Grooming Gap A ’liciah C arr How Non-Standard Accents are aected in The Job Field Samantha C larkeen-USAnthropology Capstone IIen-USArchaeological Survey of the Richardson-Bates House Oswego, NYen-US Amanda Costaen-US Cultural Expectations of Gender Norms and Mental Health Impacts on Transgender and Non-gender en-US conforming youthsen-US Lauren Degnanen-US Women, Hysteria, and Madness in the Context of Asylums in the 18th and 19th centuries.en-US Allison Feelyen-US The Structural Violence of the Health Care System Experienced \y African-American Womenen-US Tiany Floresen-US Is the SUNY Oswego transportation system actually accessible? The Student Perspectiveen-US Lindsey Gancaszen-USAnthropology Capstone III The Anthropology of Work in Modern America Ryan Gannon Genetic vs. Environmental Impacts on Human Fingerprints Nate G oldstein The Anthropology of Burial Treatments in the Modern World Karla Hernandez-Paz en-US Unseen Human Costs of Crime Scene/Unattended Death Cleanup Nicole L icourt Beyond Organized Religion? Investigating Spirituality among College Students Ryan P aternoster

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5 en-US ANTHROPOLOGYen-USAnthropology Capstone IVen-USThe Accessibility of Resources on a College Campusen-US Chelsie Scotten-US Mapping the Culture of the Nomadic Lifestyle: RV Living in NYen-US Stenie Senquizen-US The impact of Non-Native people on the Access by Native People to their Sacred Spacesen-US Tori Shawen-US The Socioeconomic Context for Understanding the Impact of College Major on Post-Graduation Incomeen-US Rahsone Simpsonen-US Understanding the concepts of mental health and culture in college studentsen-US Jasmine Tovaren-USAnthropology Capstone Ven-USStyle and Technology Exchange in Textiles in Ancient Anatoliaen-US Haley Uitvlugten-US Gaps in Knowledge: Dyslexia Teacher Training in Preservice Teachersen-US Carolyn Zeitz en-US ART AND DESIGNen-USDepartment of Art and Design Showcaseen-USThis session will present a survey of students’ creative research from the Department of Art and Design.en-USKyle Curtis, Adam Kuhn, Megan Labosky, Jia Fu Liu, Yayu Liu, Tyler Morgan, Ngan Nguyen, Keri Ngyuan, en-US en-US Miles Petersen, Francesca Rescigno, Dawson Rieman, Jessica Sandy, Madelyn Smith, Abhishek Thapa en-US en-US BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Biochemical A nalysis o f B rowning A ctivities i n A pples Christian DiBiase, Nathanial Stahl Abigail Cotner Comparing Male Northern Cardinal Plumage Color Between Rural and Urban Habitats Kristie D rzewiecki Multipl e Years of Manual Cattail Removal Slows the Expansion of an Invasive Cattail in a Sensitive Central Ne w York Fen Koty Kurtz, Kathryn Hunt Usin g Your Head! Finite Element Analysis of Head-First Burrowing Pygopodid Gec kos George G urgis

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6 en-US BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES en-US en-US CHEMISTRY en-US Isolation and Identification of Digenean Parasites from Freshwater Snails in Rice Creek Rebecca W ol Strategies f or C ost E ective P roduction of T ransgenic M ice Kevin C avalier Building a n I nexpensive E lectroporator t o Transform D ictyostelium d iscoideum Ali K han Genetic I nteraction B etween A dhesion R egulators R a p1 a nd K inase R esponsive t o Stress B in Dictyostelium discoideum Gigi N iu The Early Life of Asa Gray in Central Ne w York: America’s Greatest Botanist, Darwin’s F riend, a nd E volution A dvocate Jenna G otte Microplastic Recovery from Lake Ontario Chinook and Coho Salmon Ryan Bailine, Derek Kuhn Correlation Between Limb Length and Patterns of Stress In The Skull of Burrowing Skinks Isaac A nnal Eects o f S urface C omposition o n D ictyostelium A dhesion a nd M echanosensation Michelle Urman Measuring Periphera l Testosterone and Its Relation to Digit Ratio and S exual B ehavior Testosterone has been studied as a predictor of sexual behavior , aggressiveness, and is generally perceived as the hormone that is associated with ‘male’ behavior. This study aims to detect male testosterone levels in hair , nails, blood, and saliva using ELISA competitive enzyme assays. Part of this study w ill aim to analyze the reliability of the testosterone measurements in four biological matrices. In addition, a SIS/SES survey wi ll be used to analyze participant’s sexua l inhibition and excitation in hopes o f relating them to the individual’s testosterone levels. F inally, the ratio of the 2nd digit to the 4th d igit will be measured, which is indicative of prenatal testosterone exposure, in hope s of nding a correlation between prenatal and current t estosterone levels. Philip M osher Inhibition o f Yeast Growth by Hop Extracts In recent years many beer manufacturers have begun to follow the trend of increasing the amount of hops added into beer. With this occurring, the question of “Do hop extracts inhibit the growth of yeast?’’ arose. Yeast is one of the main ingredients essential for the creation of beer. It is crucial because the yeast converts the sugars from the malted barley into alcohol and CO2, this step is known as fermentation. Without enough yeast, fermentation can be delayed leading to o avors in the beer. to investigate this question YPD plates are used to grow dierent varieties of yeast. The growth of each yeast strain is tested with addition of various amounts of a variety of hops to the plates. Each hop variation contains a dierent percentage of alpha acid, which is tested to see the impacts of higher acid concentrations on yeast growth. to determine the impact the area of the colonies grown after three days of incubation is measured. The plates containing hops are compared to a control, which only contains yeast. The colony counts provide data to calculate percent inhibition, which has led to some evidence that hop extracts can inhibit yeast. Kaitlyn Barney

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7 en-US CHEMISTRYen-USEects of Heavy Metals on Cardiovascular Health in Children: Mediational Analysisen-USThe eect that heavy metals such as lead, mercury, and cadmium have on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk are well en-US documented. However, the mechanisms for this phenomenon are only partially understood. to explore this, a mediation en-US analysis was done using metabolomic data from a sample of a biracial cohort of 300 children to see if any metabolic pathways en-US mediate the relationship between metal concentration and CVD risk parametersen-USChristopher Gayverten-USRemoval of Volatile Organic Compounds from Indoor Air Using House Plantsen-USVolatile organic compounds (VOCs) are among the important indoor air pollutants and using plants is an easy and aordable en-US way to reduce the concentration of these compounds in the air. In the rst phase of this project, the eciency and rate of en-US simultaneous removal of eight VOCs by ve common indoor plants have been studied using a small sampling chamber. In en-US the second phase of the project, we are investigating the removal of more than thirty VOCs by a variety of indoor plants with en-US dierent sizes in a large chamber (33 in x 59 _ in x 75 _ in). The concentration of each compound was monitored over 12 hours, en-US using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) for an empty chamber en-US (as a control run) and in presence of dierent plants. The carbon dioxide and water levels were also monitored using a LI-840 en-US CO2/H2O Gas Analyzer. The results of this project will help people to select the right plants for removing the specic VOCs from en-US the indoor air.en-USEldad Sylvestreen-USAnalysis of Diphenhydramine (DPH) in Urine Using Dispersive Liquid Liquid en-US Microextractionen-USDiphenhydramine (DPH) is a main ingredient in over-the-counter antihistamine medications. Diphenhydramine is en-US also commonly used in drug facilitated crimes (DFC) as a “date rape” drug due to its sedative properties. Urinalysis is a en-US useful analysis method in regards to detecting substances which are used in DFC; however, due to the short half-life of en-US diphenhydramine, the metabolites of the drug are also analyzed. Dispersive liquid liquid microextraction (DLLME) is a popular en-US extraction technique within the forensic toxicology community. In the present research, a DLLME method was developed in en-US order to extract diphenhydramine and one of the drugs metabolites, N-desmethyl diphenhydramine, from aqueous solutions. en-US Aqueous solutions of diphenhydramine and the metabolite were prepared in concentrations of 5 ppb to 2 ppm. The pH of en-US the aqueous solutions was adjusted by adding 50 L of NaOH and 20 L of phosphate buer prior to being spiked by 1 mL of en-US a mixture of toluene and acetonitrile (13:40). The solutions were centrifuged for 20 minutes and the top layer was collected, en-US evaporated, reconstituted with 500 L of MeOH, and analyzed using GC-FID and GC-MS. With a second set of solutions en-US ranging from 50 ppb to 100 ppm in methanol, a linear calibration graph was constructed, allowing for the concentration of en-US diphenhydramine and the metabolite in the reconstituted solution to be quantied. Using the obtained data, the enrichment en-US factor and extraction recovery were calculated for the drug and the metabolite.en-USMaria Elena Mendozaen-USAnalysis of Chemically Modied Silica Gel Using NMR Spectroscopy and SEMen-USLigands can be attached to silanols on the surface of silica molecules, but only if enough water is readily available at the en-US silica surface. The amount of water available to coat the silica surface can be varied by changing the relative humidity of the en-US environment the silica is exposed to. A series of chemically modied silica surfaces, prepared using spherical silica particles en-US exposed to a relative humidity of 20%, 40%, and 70%, were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy and scanning electron en-US microscopy (SEM). These samples were all prepared using a mixture of long chain trifunctional (C18) ligands and short chain en-US difunctional (C1) ligands, with the same ratio of long to short chains in the reaction mixture. The relative number of long and en-US short chain ligands along with the crosslinking patterns on the surface, obtained from NMR, were compared. Images of the en-US ligand attachment patterns were observed through SEM and compared with the results from NMR.en-USRenasha James

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8 en-US CHEMISTRYen-USCrystallization of the Lectin-Like Domain of Thrombomodulinen-USThrombomodulin is an integral membrane protein that has a known role as the cofactor for thrombin. Its epidermal growth en-US factor (EGF) domains play a role in the regulation of blood clotting. Our research is focused on the lectin-like domain that is en-US furthest from the endothelial cell. This domain is thought to interfere with the inammatory response in a way that is distinct en-US from thrombomodulin’s role in blood clotting, but the structure of this lectin-like domain is unknown. The structure of a en-US protein helps predict the function. The purpose of this research is to crystallize the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin en-US to more fully explore what the function is and how it is implicated in inammation. As of now, yeast cells are being used en-US to express the lectin-like domain of thrombomodulin. The expressed protein is then puried through ion exchange en-US chromatography, size-exclusion chromatography, and concentrated via centrifugation. After the presence of thrombomodulin en-US in elution fractions from each column is veried by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, the attempt at crystallization can begin. en-US Various crystallization conditions will be tested using both the hanging drop and sitting drop method in hopes of obtaining en-US protein crystals for x-ray diraction.en-USMargaret Milleren-USAn Investigation of the Function of Enzyme 3L1Wen-USProtein function is often tied to structure, so structural comparisons for a protein or enzyme of unknown function may help en-US to elucidate its function. An enzyme of unknown function (PDB ID 3L1W) has been studied using various methods to predict en-US and test enzyme function. Using the sequences and structures identied during in silico examinations the function could be en-US predicted to a certain degree. Both sequence and structure alignments show that protein 3L1W most likely falls into the endo-en-US phosphatase/ exo-phosphatase family of enzymes. to study this function, 3L1W was expressed in E. coli cells and puried via en-US metal-anity chromatography as well as size exclusion chromatography. Enzyme assays were performed using p-nitrophenyl en-US acetate as a test substrate, and these show that 3L1W is a hydrolase. Assays with other relevant substrates for phosphatases en-US and nucleases are underway to monitor the more specic activity of 3L1W. Additionally, dierent buer conditions and en-US reaction times have been used along with tests to determine whether the activity of 3L1W is dependent on magnesium or en-US another metal cation, as many phosphatases are. Our knowledge of enzyme function and analysis of new enzymes can lead to en-US optimization for industrial applications or for development of drugs for disease treatment.en-USEmily Fingaren-USDeveloping In Vitro Crispr-Cas9 System Technique to Target Invader DNAen-USCRISPR is still a relatively new tool in the science world, and its abilities have only begun to be explored. Cas9 protein was en-US discovered to have nuclease abilities, creating double stranded breaks in target DNA in precise locations. This project’s goal is en-US to cut target DNA in vitro using Cas9 as an endonuclease and a sgRNA segment unique to the invading species. This research en-US will be used in teaching laboratories aimed to educate students about the abilities of CRISPR and genome editing as a whole.en-USPiper Goodleafen-USDetermining the Function of Enzyme 3DL1en-USProtein function is often tied to structure, so structural comparisons for a protein or enzyme of unknown function can aid in en-US determining function. An enzyme of unknown function (PDB ID 3DL1), derived from Klebsiella pneumonia, was studied using en-US various methods to predict and test enzyme function. Crystal structures of 3DL1 with and without zinc bound show that zinc en-US binds at a site with sequence and structural similarity to known metallopeptidases. These crystal structures also show that en-US zinc binding aects the secondary structure of the protein. Computational methods for sequence and structure analysis were en-US used to compare 3DL1 to other protein sequences and structures. These show that 3DL1 may be a hydrolase with possible en-US peptidase activity. 3DL1 was expressed in E. coli and puried via metal-anity chromatography followed by size exclusion en-US chromatography. Enzymatic assays were performed using various relevant chromogenic substrates to monitor the activity of en-US 3DL1 in the presence and absence of zinc. We have determined that 3DL1 shows slow hydrolase activity, with zinc resulting in en-US greater product formation. Tests for specic protease activity are ongoing. An understanding of enzyme function may help en-US with identifying future drug targets or in development of biological catalysts.en-USMichael Kirsch

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9 en-US CHEMISTRYen-USMulticomponent Synthesis of 1,4-disubstituted-1,2,3-Triazoles usingen-US en-US N-(Phenyl)-N-2-Pyridyl Urea as Ligandsen-USHeterocyclic compounds such as 1,2,3-triazoles have been used in many dierent elds such as: medicinal chemistry, en-US biological science, and material science. 1,2,3-triazoles can be synthesized using a copper(I) catalyzed alkyl azide cycloaddition en-US reaction, otherwise known as a click reaction. Click reactions produce 1,4-disubstituted 1,2,3-triazoles relatively quickly, with en-US high yield, low byproducts, and can happen under mild conditions. In this research an N-(phenyl)-N-2-pyridyl urea (NPPU) en-US ligand is used to catalyze the click reaction. The NPPU ligand was chosen since it is easy to make using relatively inexpensive en-US ingredients, compatible with copper, and compatible with green solvents.en-USDylan DiGrazia, Kimberlynn Spragueen-USSynthesis and Characterization of a Bimetallic Complexen-USIn order to gain a better understanding of metallophilicity, it is useful to examine a heterobimetallic species. The metallophilic en-US interactions expressed by the metals give way to unique photoemissive properties. Exploring a compound where the metals en-US are held by a mixed phosphinopyridyl ligand will help gain an understanding of how the metal atoms interact. Such a en-US phosphinopyridyl ligand was synthesized using air-free techniques, in a glove box and under a nitrogen atmosphere. While en-US the length of the ligand may vary, an ethylene spacer was used to link the phosphine and pyridine groups. The resulting ligand en-US was used to synthesize a heterobimetallic complex containing Au(I) and Cu(I) ions. The substance can be characterized using en-US a uorimeter and NMR spectroscopy. This allows for determination of a metallophilic interaction between the metal atoms en-US of the complex. Its photoemissive properties can be explored and its interactions with various solvents, such as acetonitrile, en-US methanol, and benzonitrile can be examined.en-USAnthony Pompaen-USRu(II) Complexes for Aqueous Nitrile Hydrationen-USA variety of complexes will be synthesized as potential catalysts for a commercially relevant organic transformation, the nitrile en-US and cyanohydrin conversion to amides, an important synthetic commercial intermediate chemical. A number of ruthenium en-US complexes have been reported to eciently catalyze the conversion of nitriles to amides. Our group is focused on designing en-US and synthesizing a small library of Ru(II) complexes containing a variety of water-soluble phosphine ligands. The phosphine en-US ligands will impart water-solubility to the Ru(II) complexes, enabling catalytic application for aqueous nitrile hydration to en-US amides. Synthesis of these ruthenium complexes are carried out using advanced laboratory, air sensitive Schlenk techniques en-US and characterized using instrumentation such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Future en-US research will focus on comparing the catalytic activity of these various ruthenium-phosphine complexes for nitrile hydration in en-US water under mild reaction conditions. By using water as both a reactant and solvent, the amount of reagents used and waste en-US generated is reduced. Thus, utilization of our novel Ru(II) complexes as catalysts should result in improvements to the overall en-US greenness of nitrile and cyanohydrin hydrations.en-USDakota Jackson, Morgan Wolaninen-USInvestigating Photoemissive Properties of Copper Cubanesen-USCopper cubane clusters are known to have unique optical properties and these unique properties make them suitable for en-US commercial use in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The benet of using copper compounds is they are cheaper than en-US the Iridium compounds classically used in OLEDs. Subtle changes in the chemical composition of these clusters, such as en-US substituting the bridging ligand, leads to great emission shifts. These emission shifts can be attributed to changes in the en-US coordination environment of the copper ions. Copper (I) pseudohalides such as thiocyanate and cyanide are underexplored en-US and may display interesting luminescent properties. The synthesis and characterization of these copper pseudohalide cubanes en-US are analogous to previously reported studies. The optical properties of these compounds were analyzed using uorimetry en-US followed by crystallization of the photoemissive product. Characterization of the photoemissive species will provide insight en-US into the origin of the photophysical properties.en-USEva Doty, Malik Jones

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10 en-US en-US COMMUNICATION STUDIES Current Issues in Media Law The top paper from three sections of Mass Media & the Law. The issues discussed are free speech on college campuses, net neutrality and loot boxes in gaming. Jacob Lewis, Seamus Raia, Jada Sterling Challenge D ebate w ith S UNY B rockport This is a parliamentary eebate against SUNY Brockport over the topic “This house believes that colleges and universities have a moral obligation to prohibit public expression of hate speech on their campuses.” Sarah Gray, Brandon DeFrancesco, Alexandra Borowsky, David Hite, and four debaters from SUNY Brockport Gender and Race in the Media This panel will discuss the complex representations of race and gender in contemporary media. Each panelist will examine how media texts challenge but also reinforce traditional stereotypes of race and gender in platforms such as lm, TV series, and video games. William Corsi, Kyle Meade, Morgan Scott, Julia Tilley Showcasing Student-Designed Communication Research Projects Students will share their findings from research papers in COM 403 (Research Methods) and COM 499 (Independent Study). Sabrina Ventrano and Kayla Bonasera will present “Normalization of Addictive Coping Methods for Stress with College Students” (COM 403 Paper coauthor: Schuyler Oakes). Kiana Anderson will present “The Impact of Social Stratification on People’s Perception and Identities” (COM 403 Paper coauthors: Titan Butikima and Tyquan Bethea). Taylor Rechichi will present “Exploring Gender Performance and Identity in the Pokmon Twitter community.” Sabrina Ventrano, Kayla Bonasera, Kiana Anderson, Taylor Rechichi Strategic C ommunication R esearch Graduate students will present their ongoing research projects in strategic communication. The topics include social media post e ectiveness, m ental he alth c ommunication a mong B lack c ollege s tudents, q ueer ide ntity i n on line d ating p roles, eectiveness of online dating pick-up lines, eectiveness of persuasive messages on diets, and college students’ views on marriage. Kerisha Lewis, Delani Morgan, Nicholas Chilson, Robert Robbins, Breck Donohue, Margaret Queen The I mpact o f S mart P hones on Teenagers This presentation focuses on the impact of smart phones, especially social media systems, on teenagers. It will explore the social, economic and cultural factors behind the addiction of teenagers to mobile phones, using empirical methods to investigate the psychological reasons for teenagers’ addiction to mobile phones. Finally, policy suggestions are given to improve the media literacy of teenagers. Jiu We n

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11 en-US COMPUTER SCIENCE FindingFive Story Store Development and Implementation Continuing the excitement of Computer Science, Software Engineering, and Human-Computer Interaction advances are to be experienced in this glorious session. CSC480/HCI521 Presenters TRANSition A Prize Winning Hackathon Project to Create a Wholesome Environment for People to Gain a Deeper Understanding of Their Gender Identities a nd Sexual Orientation In this session, various computer science students and faculty will present their research results which are anticipated to push the envelope into the 21st century. Bharati Mahajan, Anisha KC, Tonia Sanzo, Alexis Indick A Collaborative Robot Coordination System based on XBee Yehua Zhang, Nathan Gillette, Shaun Godfrey Remote Presentation Jolanda Tromp Video Game Challenge Alex Pantaleev en-US CREATIVE WRITING PROGRAMen-US52nd Annual Charles F. and Miriam B. Davis Creative Writing Awardsen-USCreative Writing Facultyen-USElemental Monologues: Earthen-USMonologues written and presented by advanced playwriting students.en-USSamantha Austin, Michaela Buckley, Jayden Cruz, Christopher Eastman, Edward Pisacane, en-USSh annon Soccocio, Stephanie Timpe Offering graduate pathways for every undergraduate major•SCHOLARSHIPS AND ASSISTANTSHIPS AVAILABLE •oswego.edu/gradstudies SUNY OSWEGO | DIVISION OF GRADUATE STUDIES

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12 en-US CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTIONen-USSeeing Through Their Eyesen-USIn this talk, presenters will describe a collaborative conversation each engaged in as a part of a Personal Prole assignment en-US for a preservice teacher education course. The purpose of the assignment is to learn more about the educational impact and en-US day-to-day experiences of people identied as having a disability. Selected visual representations of the lived experiences of en-US the interviewees will be on display.en-USProfessor Deborah Howarden-USInstructional Media and Technology: Presentations by Five Visiting Scholarsen-US1) Title: Inuence of Digital Equipment on Interaction Quality in Technology-Rich Classroom: Interactions in technology-rich en-US classroom have a higher level of complexity in comparison with traditional classrooms. This presentation will discuss the en-US following questions and related ndings: Is there any change on interaction due to digital equipment in technology-rich en-US classroom? Is new digital equipment more eective than traditional equipment? How does digital equipment Inuences the en-US interaction quality in technology-rich classroom?en-US 2) Title: Research on Regeneration of Online Educational Information Resources Based on Web2.0: Web2.0 provides the en-US user with feedback, which contributed to the development of user-generated content. This presentation will focus on the en-US development and utilization of user-generated content through Web 2.0 technology. It will discuss the regeneration and its en-US mechanism of online resources, the utilization of regenerated resources, and the factors that aect the regeneration and en-US utilization of information resources. en-US 3) Title: Research on the Eectiveness of Instructional Videos for Skill Operation: Instructional videos for skill operation help en-US learners acquire certain skills through learning process such as exercise and demonstration. The presentation will analyze the en-US characteristics and design requirements of instructional videos for skill operation, and discusses its learning mechanism.en-US 4) Title: The Rise and Change of Active Learning Classrooms: Active learning classroom (ALC) became popular from the middle en-US of 1990’s in the United States. Recently, the smart classroom has been quickly developed and implemented in China. In order to en-US better understand the ALC and the smart classroom, this presentation will draw out and discuss the timeline of ALC and smart en-US classroom development.en-US 5) Title: The Key Factors of Inuence on the Continued Use of Flipped Classroom Instruction: From Chinese Instructors’ en-US Perspective: The ipped classroom has gained much attention for its pedagogical success in higher education. However, en-US continued use of this technology-supported instructional approach has been problematic. To support the success and en-US continuation of ipped classroom implementation, this study employs structural equation modeling techniques to examine en-US the relationships between key factors of inuence and instructors’ continued use intention.en-USSponsor: Dr. Harrison Yangen-US Presenters: Dr. Xiaochen Wang, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at Capital Normal University, China; Dr. Xiangyang en-US He, Visiting Scholar and Professor at Hunan First Normal University, China; Dr. Shunbi Wu, Visiting Scholar and Associate en-US Professor at Guizhou Minzu University, China; Dr. He Yang, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at Hubei University of en-US Education, China; Dr. Jin Cai, Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor at Hubei University of Education, Chinaen-USEducational Spaces in International Places: Reections from the London and Benin en-US Programsen-USEDU 382 (London) and EDU 305 (Benin) were Fall 2019 Q2 courses that traveled internationally during January 2020. Through en-US lenses of culturally relevant theory and postcolonial theory, faculty leaders facilitated an examination of the educational en-US systems in these international places. This presentation will highlight reections from students and faculty with comparisons en-US of the systems. Faculty will present course goals and objectives, including course materials and resources and travel/en-US programming decisions. Undergraduate students will highlight their reections and interpretations of the theories in practice.en-USDr. Marcia Burrell, Dr. Kenneth Marshall, Dr. Ritu Radhakrishnan

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13 en-US CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION en-US Benin: Perceptions and Realities S UNY Oswego’s International Education oce-sponsored nine students and two faculty members to go to Benin west Africa, Winter 2020. This Education and Global Studies course is the seventh iteration of the Benin program since 2008. In the past, nal student projects included a 3 to 5-page paper with references from readings completed in the fall before the winter travel session. T he d igital p rojects r epresent t houghts, e xperiences, a nd p erceptions b ased o n 1 9-day tr avel e xperience i n B enin West A frica. T he v ideos, p hotographs, a nd w ords r epresent, le arning a bout t he v oodoo r eligion, c ultural v isits, hom estays, a nd school visits. These digital products come from students in the School of Business, the Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and t he S chool o f E ducation, a nd d isplay t heir p ersonalities, t houghts, a nd p erceptions a bout t heir t ravel. Dr. Mar cia B urrell, D r. K enneth Mar shall Struggles i n E ducation f or A ll Students in this class are collaboratively researching issues in education relevant to the right to know. Five presentations will entertain o utlines o f th e h istory o f s ex e ducation an d k indergarten, i ssues in A frican-American an d N ative-American e ducation, and c ontroversies a bout t he i mpact o f m edia a nd t echnology on e ducation. Dr. Tania Ramalho en-US EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIPen-USOptimal School Scheduling for Student Learningen-USWhat is the optimal length of time for middle school and high school students to be in class to maximize their learning? This en-US was the focal question this team of educational leadership candidates sought to answer as they conducted a comprehensive en-US study at the behest of Mexico Central School District’s Superintendent. An extensive review of historical data, dating back to en-US the mid-1990s, helped dene the rationale for this study. en-US Specically: Despite the fact that many sta members believe the current modied block schedule is working well, many other en-US factors indicate these perceptions are not accurate. Second, the district has not been successful in achieving a 95% pass rate for en-US any of the Regents exams. And third, the rate of absenteeism among high school students remains high, which denes another en-US reason to modify course scheduling. en-US The team also conducted surveys among teachers, parents and students, which ultimately informed several of the en-US recommendations they developed for the Superintendent and his leadership team in the Mexico Central School District.en-USLis Benavides, Tammy Cummings, Kim Rice, Sarah Wol en-US en-US ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERING Three J oint R obotic A rm This Project is a Robotic arm with three joints allowing it to move in three-dimensional space to any point given to it. The purpose of this arm is to show what robots are capable of specically relating to automating a process as well as trying to mimic a human arm both how it moves and how it interacts with objects. The arm will have endless possibilities once it is built as adding or removing certain code will allow it to complete dierent tasks. In our presentation we will discuss the research that was done when coming up with a design for the arm, how 3d printing has changed our project, what obstacles we are facing in building the arm and nally what the nal product will look like and how it will perform. Steven Hust, Rudolph Petter, James Guidi en-US High-Voltage Power Supply for Ionic Wind-Driven Systems The goal of this project is to design and implement a more ecient high-voltage power supply to be used to assist in ionicwind driven systems. The high-voltage power supply should simulate a similar functionality of the currently used Glassman high-voltage power supply in order to complement Dr. Adrian Ieta’s ionic wind research. The battery-powered design will be used to move an ionic actuator with better mobility. Therefore, the system created must be lightweight and aordable. Lauren Wensley, Binura Silva, Blake Farnham

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14 en-US ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERINGen-USTagBots: Exploring Role Changing and Team Member Identication in a en-US Polymorphic Multi-Robot Systemen-USTwo identical robots, equipped with various sensors, including a LiDAR, will run around the room. The rst robot will move en-US away from the starting point, stopping when it reaches the boundary of the play area. The second one, the It robot, will search en-US for the rst and attempt to “catch” it by bumping it.en-US The two robots will switch roles once bumped into each other. A Bluetooth handshake will occur to ensure that it was the It-bot en-US that bumped the other bot, and not something else. This will cause a brief pause to allow the new running bot a chance to run en-US away before the new It-bot will begin to chase it.en-USJessica MacKay, Tyrone Clarkeen-USAutomated Home Securityen-USHome security systems are becoming a staple for homeowners in America. The expansion of the embedded systems market en-US over the past few decades has made microprocessors and embedded RF communication commonplace in today’s society. en-US Most cell phones today contain several of these devices with WiFi, Bluetooth, GSM, and even satellite navigation right in your en-US pocket. In the home, many people are using “Smart Home” devices such as voice assistants, automated thermostats and light en-US switches. As these devices have gained a signicant amount of popularity in recent years, “Smart” home security is also a en-US rapidly growing trend.en-US There are a plethora of viral videos out there showing footage of criminal activity occurring right outside someone’s home, en-US without their home security system they may have never been alerted to any potential danger. In a study released in 2010 by en-US the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, an estimated 3.7 million burglaries occurred annually over preceden-US -en-US ing years. About 12% of homes burglarized while the occupant was present resulted in the homeowner facing an oender en-US armed with a rearm.en-US A security system of any complexity is a good step in the pursuit of ensuring that you and your loved ones are protected home. en-US The autonomous nature of our system has the added advantage of operating in a stand-alone fashion, sparing the homeowner en-US the trouble of setting an alarm or monitoring the sensors themself. Most modern security systems have sensors that can detect en-US carbon monoxide and motion or glassbreak, and record and send live video for the user to view remotely. This provides a safer en-US living environment for the occupants when they’re home or away, as well as peace of mind. Major security companies often en-US require a service or subscription that a user pays periodically, as well as relatively complicated installation.en-US An inexpensive and easy to use home security system would let the user take control of their own home security. Making ersten-US -en-US while wired sensors operate over a wireless channel would allow for the greatest ease of use for a typical consumer.en-US en-US Using XBee RF modules and a Raspberry Pi, one can create their own automated home security system with the aforemenen-US -en-US tioned functionalities. The XBee modules are used as communication devices that report sensor data back to a main unit, en-US housing a system that processes the data and responds accordingly. The Raspberry Pi will serve as the main control unit to en-US coordinate the signals coming from each sensor module, as well as transmit or store video depending on user conguration. en-US The goal of this project is to create an automated home security system that is inexpensive yet delivers the user a range of key en-US capabilities to help protect their home and loved ones from preventable harm.en-USAshish Kharka, Jonathan Castillo, Nathan Loucksen-USSmart Gymen-USGyms are part of many people’s everyday life. People spend multiple hours a day at the gym to increase their general health, en-US this energy spent by each person could have more use than just health. A Smart Gym would turn the energy created by a en-US person’s regular work out into reusable energy to power appliances. This power could go back to the power grid of the gym en-US and reduce the energy bill of the gym. Having a user interface with this technology could create an environment where people en-US can achieve energy goals as well as health goals and in turn lower the price the gym/household must spend on electricity, en-US which can lead to lower monthly payments for consumers. This technology can reduce carbon emissions and reduce energy en-US usage for not only full-scale gyms but homes as well.en-USAllen Nguyen, Joseph DiGerolamo, Ethan Van Blommestein, Francis Venne

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15 en-US ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER ENGINEERINGen-USSmart Lot: Smart Parking with Image Classicationen-USFinding parking can be dicult, frustrating, and at times, uncertain. The current parking system relies on drivers seeking an en-US available parking space. While this may not be a problem in sparsely lled parking lots, in lots near capacity drivers could easily en-US waste time looking for a spot. The aim of this project is to alleviate the hassles associated with searching for an available space. en-US To accomplish this a Convolution Neural Network (CNN) is used to determine availability via image classication. The data will en-US be collected by a sensor network and stored locally on a central server and used to populate a digital model. Users will have en-US access to population data through an interactive GUI, with the ability to reserve parking spaces within a timeframe. Smart Lot en-US aims to streamline the parking process and create an ecient, hassle-free parking environment with room for expandability.en-USAlec Suits, Sam Shebert, Tim Walrath en-US en-US HEALTH PROMOTION AND WELLNESS en-US en-US HISTORY en-US en-US HONORS Prevalence of Food Insecurity Among College Students at a Mid-Atlantic University For many college students, today, food insecurity is just a few missed paychecks away. The purpose of this mixed-method research study was to identify the prevalence of food insecurity and the possible predictors among college students at a Mid-Atlantic U nversity. Courtney Sayre, Anne Seichepin, Shane’ Weir, Rita Ntim-Gyakari, Emily Schaer Discover W ellness Researchers will briey take you through the ve stages of health programming, showcasing their transferable skills: needs assessment, data analysis, program planning, program implementation, and program evaluation. A strong emphasis will be placed on the individual health sessions and their importance to the target population. Shannon Stone, Richard McCabe, Christopher Maddaloni, Taylor Davis Senior S eminar in H istory Students in the History Department’s senior seminars will present brief overviews of their current seminar projects. Ishara Aryal, Olivia Bottari, Matthew Crary, Alexander Gault-Plate, Emily Wagner History : Faculty Papers on China This session will focus on the scholarly work of two visiting scholars from China. Dr. Li Fang, Dr. Xidao Deng South A sian S acred Sp aces Students of the History class, South Asian Sacred Spaces, will present their individual research on Indian pilgrimage networks using Digital Humanities t ools, such as an interactive media app and interactive maps. Students from HIS 336 What it Means to be a Refugee in Central Ne w York Honor (HON 301) students and a “teacher” from the refugee community will share their scholarship about refugee resettlement in Syracuse, New York. They will also discuss the role of empowering youth and adults through culturally appropriate literacy and learning activities. The panel will discuss how this 20-hour service-learning course during fall 2019 has impacted their scholarship, future career trajectories, and passion for making a dierence. This interactive panel is open to anyone who has an interest in learning from and collaborating with the local refugee communities of Central New York. Kate Gordon (Computer Science and Cognitive Science), Rachel Janish (Language and International Trade), Hamdi Farah ( English), Dr. Sandy Bargainnier (Health Promotion and Wellness)

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16 en-US en-US HUMAN DEVELOPMENTen-USHuman Development Capstone Experienceen-USThe HDV students will present information about their internship placements and program proposal ideas based on their en-US internship sites.en-USJason Powers, Mercedes Hunt, Lauren Guilds, Laura Piekunka en-US en-US LINGUISTICS PROGRAMen-USWorking on the Kiowa Dictionary Projecten-USThis session will consist of three presentations and a panel Q&A period. The rst presentation provides an overview of the en-US Kiowa Dictionary Project, a multi-site collaborative initiative to create a comprehensive dictionary for the Kiowa language en-US spoken in southwestern Oklahoma. The second presentation outlines the information included in each entry, discussing the en-US motivations for each piece of information in terms of language learning, documentation, and linguistic analysis. The third en-US presentation will focus on the fact that the dictionary includes four dierent writing systems, providing brief histories of each, en-US and comparing each of them. The Q&A session will cover all three presentations and the project as a whole.en-USAutumn Schunk, Lillian Talmage, Gabriel Warner, Ian White en-US en-US MATHEMATICSen-USCovers & Perfect Hash Functionsen-USGraphs and hypergraphs play a prominent role in many areas of computer science. In this talk we will discuss a certain graph en-US theoretic optimization problem regarding covering the complete k-uniform hypergraph, wherein the solution to this problem en-US would simultaneously solve an equivalent problem regarding perfect hash functions, important objects in computer science.en-USNicolas Van Kempenen-USFree Resolutions and Combinatorial Objectsen-USWe investigate the relationship between Combinatorics, Algebra, and Topology by studying simplicial complexes. In this, we can en-US see the transfer of critical information via computing chain complexes and the homology of our given complex. We will learn en-US exactlywhat qualities are necessary for our complex to have, in order for the chain complex producedto have desired properties.en-USJuliann Geraci en-US en-US MODERN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURESen-USModern Languages Honor Societies Induction Ceremonies • French þ • S panish þ • I talian en-USSusan Bertonneau, Zoraida Lopez and Patrick Schultzen-USStudying Abroad: GETGO Travel Grant Experiences Part Ien-USMLL Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.en-USTo be determineden-USStudying Abroad: GETGO Travel Grant Experiences Part IIen-USMLL Students who have received a GETGO travel grant, will be discussing their experiences of studying abroad.en-USTo be determined

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17 en-US en-US OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION AND PROGRAMS en-US en-US PHILOSOPHY en-US en-US PHYSICS en-US Get Uncomfortable: How to Overcome Fear and Culture Shock Abroad When traveling abroad, students must face certain fears and battle culture shock. Study abroad students Awa and Fadi will share their experiences while studying abroad in France, Benin, and the Czech Republic. They discuss the methods and tools they used to make meaning of the tough parts of their experiences overseas and after returning back to the US. Each presenter will share excerpts of their vlogs, journals, interviews, and more. Not only did they conquer their fears but they also learned things about their own identities that they had never appreciated before. Through this session, participants will learn how they too can discover the tools needed for successfully facing their fears abroad and battling culture shock. Awa Dembele, Fadi Gaye What a re T heoretical E ntities? Do the entities referred to in theories exist? For example, when we talk of beliefs and desires and other mental states, do these really exist or are they just a useful way of talking about people? Or when physicists talk of quarks or strings, do these things exist are or they just useful proposals? This session will grapple with these questions of realism versus anti-realism. Emma Hulsing and Dylan Smith Transition Metal Doped Quantum Dots for Photovoltaic Applications In recent years, semiconductor zinc sulde (ZnS) quantum dots have been considerably studied for various applications such as light emitting diodes, at panel display, UV sensor and solar cell application. We discuss herein the optical and transport properties of the transition metal doped quantum dots and optimize them for better photovoltaics. Zinc sulde has an excellent optical and electronic performances due to its wide band gap. In addition, cobalt-nickel doped zinc sulde brings a versatility of the band gap energy. This is corresponding to an enhancement in the photo-to-current eciency of doped quantum dots in sensitized solar cell. In this study, we explore how the dierent dopants lead changes in the band gap and discuss the characteristic of these doped quantum dots. The absorption data shows that cobalt-nickel doped ZnS has the highest absorbance the visible range out of all the single and co-doped and tri-doped quantum dots which made it the best candidate f or op toelectronic de vice f abrication. Trieu L e The Hydrogen Ionization Front and Stellar Photosphere Interaction in Radially Pulsating V ariable S tars The Hy drogen-Ionization-Front ( HIF) i s a r apidly c hanging r egion o f t he o uter s tellar e nvelope w here h ydrogen i s i onizing. T he Stellar photosphere (optical depth 2/3) is where the bulk of th e observed radiation from these stars originates f rom. Here we show how the HIF-Stellar photosphere interaction can explain the observed character o f Period-Color relation s in 4 types o f variable stars (Cepheids, RR Lyraes, BL Hers and W Virs). W e discuss the implications of our results. Brett M eerdink Fabry-Perot Interferometer in Laser Spectroscopy Applications External-cavity diode lasers (ECDL) are widely used i n spectroscopy applications. These applications typically r equire precise and smooth single-mode wavelength scanning of the lase r for a period of time. In ECDL, wavelength scanning is achieved by changing the grating angle via piezoelectric transducer . However, due to the hysteretic behavior of piezoelectric devices t he scanning wavelength is not proportional to the applied linear voltage and results in a changing wavelength that is non-linear in nature. Here, we present a procedure to linearize such a wavelength scan using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. Logan S perano

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18 en-US en-US PHYSICS Measuring the Hyperne Splittings of Rubidium 5P3/2 Excited State Using Saturated A bsorption S pectroscopy One of the laser-based spectroscopy techniques, the Saturated Absorption Spectroscopy (SAS) was performed to measure the hyperne energy splittings of rubidium 5P3/2 excited state. Two low-power beams at 780.24 nm produced by an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) were sent through a vapor cell containing 85Rb and 87Rb. Another strong (high-power) beam from the same laser crosses one of the two beams in the opposite direction through the vapor cell. With atoms absorbing more energy from this strong beam, the low-power beam then shows less absorption while the laser is scanning through the 5S1/2 (Ground) -> 5P3/2 atomic transition. By directing the two low-power beams transmitted through the vapor cell at a dierential photodiode, an atomic spectrum corresponding to the hyperne transitions was obtained. Analysis of these spectra collected under various conditions resulted in a precise measurement of hyperne splittings as well as the isotope shift of rubidium 5P3/2 state. Elina Van Kampen, Trieu Le Investigating the Nature of the Hydrogen Ionization Front in Classical C epheids Classical Cepheids are radially pulsating stars which are crucial for the non-Cosmic-Microwave Background distance scale and for constraining theories of stellar pulsation and evolution. Adams and Castor (1979) computed a non-linear full amplitude 10-day pulsation model of a classical Cepheid and showed that the hydrogen ionization front briey changed from a D type to an R type at a particular phase of the expansion. Here we analyze a series of classical Cepheid models made with a modern pulsation code (MESA/RSP) and investigate if such a transitory type ionization front exists. We discuss the implications of our results. Anthony Chalmers en-US Magnetic Levitation In the past ten years, magnets and the magnetic elds they create have been part of a major boost in modern technology. Maglev trains and Eddy braking are two examples of the many applications that use changing magnetic elds to create magnetic le vitation or m agnetic b raking. C ompanies l ike H endo h ave p roduced ho verboards u sing s trong ne odymium m agnets, utilizing their strong magnetic elds. These magnets are congured in a Halbach array which creates an amplied eld on one side of the array and a diminished eld on the opposite side. When this array is positioned in a circular pattern and spun, the changing magnetic eld produces a lift force that can carry as much as 192 kg. Although the construction and application of this array has already been completed, there is currently no theory relating all of the variables part of this hovering machine. Using empirical data, a relationship between all of these variables can be found and then derived from Faraday’s law of induction Matthew Sodano, Jared Bouldin en-US en-US POLITICAL SCIENCEen-USCan’t We All Get Along? Finding Common Ground in a Polarized Worlden-USThis session features a debate between representatives of the College Dems, College Republicans, International Socialist en-US Organization and Young Americans for Freedom. The goal of this event will be to hear dierent points of view on certain en-US current events in a civilized manner. The point of this panel will show that we can have discussions about the issues important en-US to us in a productive and benecial way.en-USMark Harris, Nicole Evans, Alexander Ehrenberg, Jenn Robilotto, Wyatt Fulton, Tyler Toomey

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19 en-US en-US PSYCHOLOGYen-USMental Imagery and Aphantasiaen-USThe purpose of this research study was to examine a newly coined condition, aphantasia. Congenital aphantasia is a condition en-US in which an individual is born with an absence of mental imagery. To classify subjects as aphantasic or non-aphantasic, each en-US subject completed the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (VVIQ) (Marks, 1973) . All subjects completed two tasks en-US designed to evaluate mental imagery using Mousetracker ( Freeman & Ambady, 2010) . The tasks included Kosslyn’s (1978) en-US mental map scanning task and Shepard and Metzler’s (1971) mental rotation task. In a mental rotation task participants en-US mentally rotate pairs of presented stimuli and decide if they are identical to one another or if they are mirror images. In the en-US mental scanning task participants memorize a map of a made up island, then mentally travel between locations on the map. en-US We predicted that we would see no dierence in basic response times for subjects with aphantasia when compared to controls. en-US However, the mouse trajectories would allow for more insight into the decision making process by revealing subtle dierences.en-USMariah Johst, Theo Rhodesen-USMediating Eects of Attachment Style on Traumatic Experience and en-US Psychopathological Symptomatologyen-USThe Stress Buering Model posits that the eects of social support is predictor of better psychiatric outcomes as this support en-US provides an environment in which an individual feels they can more readily cope with their stressors. Attachment style looks at en-US how people form and maintain relationships stemming from early childhood experiences and is used in this study to see how it en-US impacts perceptions of support in individuals who have gone through a traumatic experience and subsequently the processes en-US that each attachment style has been shown to relate to particular coping styles that factor into their rate of recovery. Traumatic en-US experiences will be grouped based on assaultive vs not as it has been shown in previous research that assaultive type traumas en-US result in worse overall outcomes and in some cases feelings of distrust which is predicted to impact perceptions of support. en-US This project will use self-report measures to assess these variables in the general student population and will be analyzed en-US using mediation and moderation models.en-USDakota Trejo, Samara Riceen-USResource Constraints on Embodied Human Foraging Behavioren-USWe measured foraging patterns of human participants using easter eggs as simulated resources. We placed 100 easter en-US eggs around an outdoor quad. The task was to locate as many easter eggs as possible within a set timeframe. Participants en-US wore a head camera to track their movement while collecting eggs. Participants either searched for eggs placed in a en-US clustered distribution or a uniform distribution. Based on prior research on human hunter-gatherers (Brown et al., 2006), we en-US hypothesized that human foraging would exhibit Lvy-like dynamics, where short movements in random directions are en-US connected by much rarer, but much larger movements. Lvy-like behavior has been identied in a range of foraging behaviors, en-US and may increase search eectiveness under certain circumstances (Viswanathan et al., 2001). Both the eectiveness and en-US dynamics of search behaviors may be altered by dierences in resource distributions, values, and other embodied constraints. en-US This research was designed to further knowledge on human search behavior in the real world, and to determine if search en-US patterns change when the distribution of resources change. This experiment is an exploration of foraging behavior in a en-US naturalistic, but controlled environment, allowing examination of the eects of dierent levels of constraints on search en-US behavior, such as ecological, embodied, and task constraints.en-USRachel Simizon, Giovanni Anastasio, Joshua Hull, Ben Wilson, Theo Rhodes Have a passion for research?SUNY Oswego’s Scholarly and Creative Activities Committee can help you fund it!SCAC grants supported 14 faculty-student collaborative projects with over $50,000 this past summer alone. We fund work from all disciplines—arts and sciences alike. Some recent examples include: “Writing the Sea: A Digital Archive of Morgan Robertson,” “Retinoic Acid Signaling; Or, Skeletal Structures in Reptile Eyes,” and “Studying the Light Curves of Stars with NASA’s Kepler Satellite”Find out more at: https://www.oswego.edu/orsp/internal-grants-and-recognition-awards

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20 en-US en-US PSYCHOLOGYen-USEarly Adverse Childhood Experiences and Big Five Personality Traits as Mediators of en-US Emergent Psychopathological Symptomologyen-USPsychopathology, as explained by personality, has in recent years had an upsurge in research. The current study adds to en-US the base of research by investigating if the BIG Five personality traits and childhood abuse play a mediating role between en-US personality traits such as impulsivity and psychopathological symptomology in a non-clinical sample. It is hypothesized in en-US the current study that: (1) high neuroticism is an indicator of depressive symptoms, and the presence of childhood abuse en-US will predict severity. (2) Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) will be correlated to neuroticism and have some inuence on en-US emerging psychopathology due to child abuse. (3) Openness to experience is hypothesized to predict cannabis use disorder en-US and, when paired with childhood abuse, either bipolar I or II. (4) Conscientiousness is hypothesized to predict depression. (5) en-US Extraversion is predicted to be correlated with alcohol use disorder. (6) Borderline is predicted to be a result of equal parts en-US neuroticism and extraversion. (7) All secondary predictors of psychopathology have no prior and are included merely for en-US exploratory purposes. Secondary predictors include impulsivity, emotional intelligence, executive function, consideration en-US of future consequences, and familial relationship quality. Participants will be college students from SUNY Oswego, general en-US public recruited online through social media, and the general public of Oswego Town. Participants will answer multiple en-US questionnaires to assess where they fall in the spectrum of personality and psychopathological symptomology. Data analysis en-US will consist of multiple regressions on primary predictors and a mediation analysis using Preacher and Hayes’ (2004) bootstrap en-US method on all secondary predictors.en-USAdira Brown-DeVirgilio, Samara Riceen-USSex Dierences in the Association of Threat Bias and the Amygdalaen-USThis study investigated the sex dierences of the association between threat bias and the resting state functional connectivity en-US (rs-FC) of the amygdala using public data from the Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample. Seventy healthy controls en-US (female = 41) performed a dot probe task that consisted of two faces (either threatening or neutral) where one face would be en-US replaced by a dot eliciting a corresponding response. In addition, subjects underwent a ve-minute resting state functional en-US Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) where whole brain rs-FC was calculated with the amygdala being the seed region. The en-US results showed that males and females are not signicantly dierent in the amygdala’s whole brain rs-FC but are dierent in en-US the correlations between threat bias and amygdala’s rs-FC. In particular, females exhibited signicant, positive correlations en-US between threat bias and the amygdala-thalamus and amygdala-insula rs-FCs, and negative correlations between threat en-US bias and the amygdala-caudate rs-FC, amygdala-subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) rs-FC, and amygdala-inferior en-US frontal cortex (IFC) rs-FC, respectively. On the contrary, males did not show any signicant correlations between threat bias en-US and amygdala’s rs-FC. These results echoed previous research highlighting the roles of amygdala-thalamus rsFC in higher en-US sensitivity to threat, and amygdala-insula rsFC in increased emotional regulation, as well as amygdala-limbic system rsFC to en-US decreased stress in females.en-USSamantha Jenks, Sien Huen-USUtility of Eye Tracking in the Investigation of How Children Resolve Linguistic en-US Ambiguities in the Presence of Classroom Background Noiseen-USSpeech perception is a critical foundation for language use where the sounds of language are heard, interpreted and underen-US -en-US stood are investigated (Holt & Lotto, 2010). The important role of spoken and written communication in school-aged children’s en-US lives suggests that individual dierences in these skills entail benets and risks.en-US The present speech perception experiment of nine to 11-year-olds assesses listening comprehension under two primary en-US conditions. One condition contains syntactic ambiguities where a sentence has the ability to be interpreted in multiple ways en-US due to the sentence structure having an ambiguous nature. The second condition contains multiple meaning ambiguities en-US where the presence of a word in a sentence that has the possibility to refer to dierent things based on the context leaving the en-US meaning of the word unclear until more information is provided. Also studied is the eect of classroom background noise on en-US the resolution of ambiguities. Schafer et al. (2013) found that a background signal-to-noise ratio of -5 dB signicantly aects a en-US child’s listening comprehension; we predict that even less noise will be disruptive for syntactically ambiguous stimuli.en-US A Pupil Labs eye tracker is being used to measure children’s xations on cartoon scenes that correspond to the ambiguous en-US sentences given. In order to examine how children are dealing with ambiguities patterns of gazes on cartoons scenes are en-US investigated. The number of xations duration of xations. In addition to examining children’s xations children’s verbal en-US responses are recorded to assess each child’s process of interpreting the ambiguities. Themes in children’s responses will be en-US analyzed as qualitative data to identify any patterns of how children are resolving ambiguities. Also, a language processing en-US skills assessment (TAPS-4) was given. To-date a total of 25 children have participated in the study and of those there are en-US datasets from 13 children that are ready to analyzed. Data reduction and analysis is underway. Results have implications for en-US deeper understanding of the development of auditory-visual processing of ambiguities in speech that can help children with en-US comprehension challenges get support needed to be successful in academia.en-USGabriella DeAngelo, Alex Rivera, Leigh Bacher

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21 en-US PSYCHOLOGYen-USRedeveloping and Piloting of a Children’s Social Skills Programen-USSocial skills development programs, with a focus on both emotional awareness and eective communication skills, are en-US being conducted in our communities nationwide. While the primary focus has been on deciding which social skills should en-US be targeted by these programs, there is a need for more research into which method of delivering this information fosters en-US the most productive environment for obtaining and retaining this information. Current programs use a variety of methods en-US from video segments to conversation-based strategies in order to teach kindergarten aged children a variety of skills from en-US cooperation and kindness to verbal and nonverbal cues. The present study focuses on the redevelopment of the adapted en-US scripts from the Social-Emotional Adjustment and Resilience program (SOAR) from a primarily conversationbased method to en-US an activity focused style of teaching. Two classrooms of children ages 3 to 5 and focus of future social skills programs.en-USRebecca Sawleren-USInternet Addiction: Gaming, Social Media, and role of Personalityen-USAs high-speed connections increase in their availability and accessibility, the public interest in Internet Addiction is rising. en-US Internet Addiction is a categorical term containing a variety of Impulse Control Disorders (ICD) on the internet. These en-US subcategories include: gaming, social media, pornography, gambling, and shopping (as dened by addiction questionnaire en-US criteria). Just as gambling addiction was not legitimized recognized by the American Psychiatric Association until 1994; the en-US DSM-5 has only recently included Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in 2013 (American Psychiatric Association, 2013; Rennert, et en-US al., 2014). IGD appears to have worse prognostic indicators than the other sub-categories of IAD. Signicant attention has been en-US given to the phenomenon of social media; as social network participation reaches record global highs and rising. Researchers en-US have been investigating the compulsive use of social media; Social Media Addiction (SMA). Internet gaming and social media en-US use seem to be the two most popular activities on the internet with adolescents and young adults. The purpose of this study en-US is to assess personality and situational dierences between the two conditions, testing the Quality of Real Life Hypothesis en-US (virtual escapism predicted by objective and subjective well-being), and comorbidity prevalence without diagnostic en-US information. [Project Ongoing]en-US Researchers hypothesize: (1) that neuroticism will be positively correlated with IAD, IGD, and SMA, (2) conscientiousness will en-US be negatively correlated to IAT, IGD, and SMA, (3) extraversion, agreeableness, and openness will be signicantly dierent en-US between IGD and SMA group (4) agreeableness will be associated with SMA, and extraversion will be associated with IGD.en-USJohn Gillies, Samara Rice en-US en-US SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Internal Carbon Pricingat SUNY Oswego Global warming continues to reach an all-time high, it is vital that the college community works to combat this problem. When it comes to reducing our carbon footprint as a campus there is no single solution. The Internal Carbon Pricing Model at SUNY Oswego gives plans that can and should be considered in order to reduce the carbon footprint of the campus community. We will provide a handful of models that we feel will make the biggest impact and are the best t for our campus. Spencer Johnson, Omar Van Reenen, Linden Merrill Chinese Shadow Banking Operation Mechanism and Risk Transmission Huiyi Z hang Impression F ormation: I nteractive E ects o f A ttire a nd G ender on P erceptions of E thical B ehavior Eyal S hamban, T ianna M oxley Warren Buett’s Stock Picking Methodology Daniela Aquino, Anthony Pasquarella aluation of Graham Manufacturing’s Equity Daniel Bergin, Tyler Hughes, Noah Jones, Brayan Reyes, Andrew Saunders

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22 en-US SCHOOL OF EDUCATION:en-US en-US TEACHER OPPORTUNITY CORPS II (SOE FIELD PLACEMENT OFFICE) en-US TECHNOLOGY en-US THEATRE Voices from TOC II Scholars: Why Representation Matters, the “Cultureless” S tudents The School of Education TOC II Scholars believes that representation, identity, and culture matter and that school should be welcoming and safe for everyone. However, many students, especially those of color feel as if they need to assimilate or strip away their identity and culture to have a place in the education system. As future educators, it is sometimes hard yet necessary to check our biases before our students enter our classroom. During this interactive presentation, TOC II Scholars will explore/ address implicit bias, individual identities/culture, and why it is truly important to have educators of color in the eld. Through personal stories and research, this presentation will also present strategies for non-teachers of color to promote a safe learning space for all students especially the ones who feel as though the education system was not set up for their success. We will work collaboratively to identify ways we can leave our biases and privileges at the door to allow for all identities and cultures to be welcomed and respected in our classes, in our school, and in our community. Facilitators: Tamara Dalton and Anabelle Maldonado Teacher Opportunity Corps (TOC II ) Scholars The A rt o f M echatronics a nd M anufacturing Technology: A D emonstration This 20-minute presentation/demonstration will give an overview of how CNC routers, laser cutters, and 3D printers are being used technically and artistically to support Team Mini’s eorts to continually entertain and engage fans. The process from initial programming to nishing pieces will be shown. We will be unveiling our latest project, a fully functioning batterypowered audio animatronic gure operated by VEX components. Nathaniel Caneld, Josh Arnold ‘Acting S hakespeare’ S elections Acting Shakespeare students will present selections from Shakespeare’s notable plays. Bayana Burnell, Megan Campbell, Lawrence Defay-Altenor, Kayla Elfers, Tyler Guy, Dwan Hameed, Katy Hartzell, Evan Piccolo, Selena Piero, Giovanni Rodriguez, Cassandra Slough, Mackenzie VanHorn, Maren Walsh, Mya Brown (professor) Research to Performance: Dynamic Devised Plays Four original performances. Students used strategies from Anne Bogart and Tina Landau’s Viewpoints and Tectonic Theatre Group’s Moment Work to build these short works in progress. These methods allow groups to create new plays collaboratively, working on their feet, rather than as individuals writing on the page. Students have shared, interpreted and synthesized extensive research driven by their own curiosity. A brief Q & A session will follow the performances. Seth Nesbitt, Robert Giumarra, Giovanni Rodiguez, Diamond Hoggard-Shannon, Amanda Gydesen, Ryan Parrish, Michaela Buckley, Bayana Burnell, Abigail Hines, Anastasia Grimando-West, Addie Torres, Evan Piccolo, Amy Lynn Budd (instructor) We Band of Prodigals: the ‘Kill Shakespeare’ Live Graphic Novel Process In February of 202, professors Toby Malone and Patrick Mathis collaborated with a group of students and faculty members to create ‘Kill Shakespeare: the Live Graphic Novel’, which performed to a sold-out audience at the Waterman Theatre. Join both professors to discuss the creation and challenges of translating a graphic novel into performance form. Toby Malone, Patrick Mathis Kill Shakespeare Capstone Presentation A showcase of the media editing that was presented within the Kill Shakespeare live graphic novel including animation and video e ects. Jeremy E ldred

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23 en-US THEATREen-US“Um, Actually...”: the Dramaturgy of ‘Dungeons and Dragons’ en-USC ulture in ‘She Kills Monsters’en-USA presentation of dramaturgy work relating to SUNY Oswego’s April production of “She Kills Monsters.”en-USDominique Baker-Lanning, Kuvar Bhatnagar, James Hough, Toby Malone, Patrick Mathisen-USPlay Reading: “Most Likely to Succeed” by Sean Patrick Ryanen-USJames returns to high school for his 5-year reunion and nds himself talking to someone from his past who he never thought en-US he’d see again.en-USSean Ryan, Nick Sweet, Katy Hartzell

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24 Quest 2020 postersen-USAtmospheric and Geological Sciences — Geology 1. þ en-USAnalysis of Glacial Erratics at Rice Creek Field Station, en-US Oswego, NYen-US John Christopher, Kathryn Ploss, Gabrielle Moro, Joseph Maier 2. þ en-USMiddle School Student Contributions to Undergraduate Earthen-US Science Research at Rice Creek Field Station, Oswego, NYen-US Gabrielle Moro, John Christopher, Ian Insley 3. en-USPhysical modeling of the impact of bank coherency on en-USriver morphologyen-US Mich ael Smith 4. en-USEstablishing a Framework for Interpreting Sediment Grain en-US size as a Proxy for Hydroclimate Changes at Searles Lake, CAen-US Dr. Justin S. Stroup, Mary Sorensen, Rebeca Nessel, Dr. David en-US McGee, Dr. Tim K. Lowenstein, Kristian J. Olson, Dr. Christine Y. en-US Chen, Mark Peaple, Dr. Sarah J Feakins, Dr. Joseph J. Janick, and en-US Jade Brush 5. þ en-USAn assessment of the evolution of Junius Ponds, NY from en-US 1938 to 2019: Lake and wetland changes pre and post I-90 en-US constructionen-US Karissa Sumell, Dr. Justin Stroup, Sarah King, and Richard Frieman 6. en-USEstablishing the Stratigraphic Framework for New Samples en-US From Searles Lakeen-US Hayley Mosher, James Coble and Dr. Justin Stroup 7. en-USA rst look at bog cores from Junius Ponds, NYen-US Emily Dolan, and Dr. Justin Stroup 8. en-USExamining the Petrology and Grain Size of Glacial Sediment en-USat Rice Creek Field St ation, Oswego, NYen-US Joseph Maier, Kathryn Ploss 9. en-USAssessing Drying Times of Evaporite Lake Sediments: Low en-US Temperature Oven vs. Freeze Dryeren-US James Coble, Hayley Mosher and Dr. Justin Stroupen-USBiological Sciences 10. en-USDo rainbow smelt in Lake Ontario display two recently en-USevolved ecotype s?en-US Justin Searles 11. þ en-USThe inuence of noise pollution on bird diversityen-US Veronica Wright 12. en-USComparative anatomy of the unifacial and bifacial regions en-US of the sword-shaped leaves of the Sweet Iris, Iris pallidaen-US Kathryn Hunt, Caleb Stahl 13. þ en-USGut microbes and uric acid metabolism in Drosophila en-US melanogasteren-US Leticia Preciado What state is environmental DNA found in water samples and does that affect detection rates in the River Otter? Sydney Waloven Examining the role of alpha-actinin in Dictyostelium response to mechanical stimuli Stephanie Arcello Creating genomic resources for environmental DNA assay development for threatened and endangered turtle species” in the archives but titled Lilly Pavord Understanding the role of actin-crosslinking protein filamin in mechanosensation of Dictyostelium cells Colin Harrington Molecular cloning of Dictyostelium filamin lacking the actinbinding domain Sarah Buckler Histopathology of a mantle edge fibroma in a juvenile wavyrayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola Lauren Degnan Developing environmental DNA assays to survey for the Fisher Caroline Sheldon Investigating synergistic growth of two gut bacteria: Lactobacillus and Acetobacter Hiruni Dodangoda, Precise Mcgirt Testing for the presence of Ranavirus and chytridiomycosis in amphibians Shawn Geary, Santiago Soto Examining the role of Talin-A in mechanosensation of Dictyostelium cells Scott Howe The Comparative Study of Eggshells of Passerine Birds Muhammadzohir Hidoyatov Seasonal differences in mammal activity at Rice Creek Field Station Nicole Rose Comparison of the maxilla and lower jaws of the burrowing asps Atractaspis irregularis, Atractaspis aterrima, and Homoroselaps lacteus Regan Saltzer Evaluating the Distribution And Diversity of New York State Crayfishes at Rice Creek Field Station Cait Stearns, Sayuri Pacheco A genetic suppressor screen to find novel partners of an adhesion regulator KrsB in Dictyostelium discoideumEmily Fingar

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25en-USChemistry en-US SUNY Oswego Agricultural Testing and Analysis Laboratories – Grain Testing Internship: Expand your Horizons! Jenna Gotte, Timothy Bodah, Garrett Hausman Synthesis and Design of an NNN-Pincer Ligand Michael Scott Designing a drug analysis experiment for forensic students Pruthuvi Heenatigala, Manoj Santhakumar, Oshadhi Theshan Palanda Liyanage Perera Analysis of Soil Profile for Presence of Lead Claire Millington Biophysical Investigation of the Function of Enzyme 3DL1 Ali Khan Development of a Photodegradable Polyester Bailey Phelps Atmospheric Concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs and Organochlorine Pesticides Daria Savitskaia Optical and Transport Properties of Inorganic Perovskites Roselyn Tofaen-USCommunication Studies en-US 37. Does the Truth Matter in Politics? A Review of Campaign en-US Advertisement Law in America Thomas Waizeneggeren-USComputer Science Paper Game: UI A fantasy tabletop RPG played with a Computer interface Tonia Sanzo Piptopiae Christian D eVito What does a Software Engineering degree from SUNY Oswego look like? Matthew Fernandez Pick Me Up: The Carpooling App Alexander Lawrence, Ethan Mess Natural Language Understanding of Clinical Practice Guidelines Rose Fontana, Kate Gordon, Adrian Naaktgeboren, Dan Schlegel Survival Prediction of Breast Cancer Patient from Gene Methylation Data with Deep LSTM Network and Ordinal Cox model Guanghui Liu, Chris Bartlett, Isabelle Bichindaritzl Case-based Reasoning for the Analysis of Methylation Data in O ncology Christopher Bartlett, Guanghui Liu, Isabelle Bichindaritz Biomedical and Health Informatics Demo Lab PaolaMarn Veites, Miracle Chinweuba Exploration of Methods to Analyze Epigenetics and Epidemiology of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Using Python and R Sarah Masonen-USCurriculum and Instruction 47. þ en-USMath Literacy: A Primer to Understanding Problem Solving en-US Skills Through Reading in A Secondary Schoolen-US Brian Dawsonen-USElectrical and Computer Engineering 48. en-USThrust measurements in ionic rotary systemsen-US Waley Zhang, Kwabena Boateng, Tyrone Clarke, Adedayo en-US Adeyanju, Mohamed Ayad, James Guidi, Adrian Ietaen-USHealth Promotion and Wellness en-US 49. OUR PLATE: Models for Culturally Inclusive Nutrition en-US Education Rita Ntim-Gyakari, Dr. Sandy Bargainnier, Dr. Najah Zaaeeden-USMathematics 50. þ en-USSusan Deckeren-US Alexandra Hayes, Jonathan Schmidt 51. þ en-USSquare Root Extraction Method in Ancient Indiaen-US Ka Ying Chan 52. þ en-USEdouard Lucasen-US Jourdan Lord 53. þ en-USAnalytical predictions of world events through the eyes en-USof Nate Silveren-US Brian Dawson , Devin Sagendorf 54. en-USThe Four Color Map Theoremen-US Deanna Santiago 55. þ en-USJoseph Fourier: Mathematician Physicist Historianen-US John Zammiello, Sean Goodhue 56. þ en-USGeorg Cantor: Sets and Innityen-US Matt Blair, David Henniganen-USPolitical Science 57. en-USThe Eects of High Exposure to Climate Change Issues en-US Online on Political Polarizationen-US Dylan Genthneren-USPsychology en-US 58. The Relationship Between Model Size, Positive Body Image en-US Education, and Body Self-Esteem Kelsey Robert s, Jillian Hunt, Grace Strojny, Ashlee Moore

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26 Health consciousness and disease avoidance Zach Carapetyan, Adam Fay Life history theory as a predictor for mate age preferences on the SUNY Oswego campus Emily Gordon, Adam Fay Effects of practicing mindfulness on the temptation to abuse alcohol Erin David, Shay Elster, Samara Rice Blinking and thinking: Explorations of blinking and looking during a working memory task in children Alex Rivera, Gabi DeAngelo, Carley Estep, Nicole Thomas, Skyler Stisser, Taylor Trainor, Ian Rowe, Leigh Bacher MBSR Stress Reduction Study A’Liciah Carr, Stephen Thompson, Stacey Clark, Lauren Wright, Meghan Rowe, Karen Wolford Sensory Processing and Perception of Emotions A’Liciah Carr, Tianna Moxley, Emani Blue, Emily Bovier, Adam Fay Thematic analysis of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) reports by college students Meghan Ransford, Samara Rice Does Pupil Diameter Predict the Effects of Cognitive Load or Incentive on Working Memory Performance? Ian Rowe, Leigh Bacher Associating Facial Symmetry to Enhanced Memory Retention Justine Mahler, Adam Fayen-USTheatre 68. en-USHow about From Page to Performance: The Scenic Design en-US Process From Script Analysis to Opening Nighten-US Amanda Estrella 69. þ en-US‘Fun Home’ Stage Management Binderen-US Nicole Caroselli 70. en-USTHT 314: Stage Propertiesen-US Oliver Pratt, Alexis Miller, Matthew Larkin, Dwan Hameed, Samuel en-US Gregory, Tatyanna Gay, Amanda Estrella, Lyta Dusel, Darian en-US Deeley, Jessa Costa, Nicole Caroselli, Nathaniel Caneld, Oluwaseyi en-US Afolayan | Faculty: Ola Kraszpulska 71. en-USFrom Page to Performance: The Scenic Design Process from en-US Script Analysis to Opening Night.en-US Amanda Estrella

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27 A þ en-USAdedayo Adeyanju þ. ........................................... en-US25en-US en-US Oluwaseyi Afolayan þ. .......................................... en-US26en-US en-US Giovanni Anastasio þ. ........................................... en-US19en-US en-US Kiana Andersonen-US ..................................................en-US 10en-US en-US Isaac Annal þ. ............................................................. en-US6en-US en-US Daniela Aquino þ. .................................................. en-US21en-US en-US Stephanie Arcello þ. .............................................. en-US24en-US en-US Josh Arnold þ. .......................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Ishara Aryal þ. .......................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Samantha Austin þ. ............................................... en-US11en-US en-US Mohamed Ayad þ. ................................................. en-US25en-US en-US B en-USLeigh Bacher þ. ................................................ en-US20en-US , en-US26en-US en-US Ryan Bailine þ. ........................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Dominique Baker-Lanning þ. ............................ en-US23en-US en-US Sandra Bargainnier þ. .................................... en-US15en-US , en-US25en-US en-US Kaitlyn Barneyen-US .......................................................en-US 6en-US en-US Christopher Bartlett þ. ......................................... en-US25en-US en-US Lis Benavides þ. ...................................................... en-US13en-US en-US Daniel Bergin þ. ...................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Susan Bertonneau þ. ............................................. en-US16en-US en-US Kuvar Bhatnagar þ. ................................................ en-US23en-US en-US Matthew Blair þ. ..................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Emani Blue þ. ...................................................... en-US4en-US , en-US26en-US en-US Kwabena Boateng þ. ............................................. en-US25en-US en-US Timothy Bodahen-US ...................................................en-US25en-US en-US Kayla Bonasera þ. ................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Alexandra Borowsky þ. ........................................ en-US10en-US en-US Olivia Bottari þ. ...................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Jared Bouldin þ. ...................................................... en-US18en-US en-US Emily Bovier þ. ......................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Hannah Brown þ. ..................................................... en-US4en-US en-US Adira Brown-Devirgilio þ. ................................... en-US20en-US en-US Sarah Buckler þ. ...................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Michaela Buckley þ. ........................................ en-US11en-US , en-US22en-US en-US Bayana Burnellen-US ....................................................en-US 22en-US en-US Marcia Burrell þ. ............................................... en-US12en-US , en-US13en-US C þ en-USMegan Campbell þ. ............................................... en-US22en-US en-US Nathaniel Caneld þ. ..................................... en-US22en-US, en-US26en-US en-US Zachary Carapetyan þ. ......................................... en-US26en-US en-US Nicole Carosellien-US ...................................................en-US 26en-US en-US A’Liciah Carr þ. .................................................... en-US4en-US , en-US26en-US en-US Kevin Cavalier þ. ....................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Anthony Chalmers þ. ............................................ en-US18en-US en-US Nicholas Chilson þ. ................................................ en-US10en-US en-US Miracle Chinweuba þ. ........................................... en-US25en-US en-US John Christopher þ. ............................................... en-US24en-US en-US Stacey Clark þ. ......................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Samantha Clarke þ. .................................................. en-US4en-US en-US Tyrone Clarke þ. ............................................... en-US14en-US , en-US25en-US en-US James Coble þ. ........................................................ en-US24en-US en-US William Corsi þ. ....................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Amanda Costa þ. ...................................................... en-US4en-US en-US Jessa Costa þ. ........................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Abigail Cotneren-US .......................................................en-US 5en-US en-US Matthew Crary þ. .................................................. en-US15en-US en-USJayden Cruz þ. ......................................................... en-US11en-US en-US Tammy Cummings þ. ............................................ en-US13en-US en-US Kyle Curtis þ. .............................................................. en-US5en-US D þ en-USErin David þ. ............................................................. en-US26en-US en-US Taylor Davis þ. ......................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Brian Dawson þ. ...................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Gabriella DeAngelo þ. .......................................... en-US20en-US en-US Darian Deeley þ. ..................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Lawrence Defay-Altenoren-US .................................en-US 22en-US en-US Brandon Defrancesco þ. ...................................... en-US10en-US en-US Lauren Degnan þ. ............................................. en-US4en-US , en-US24en-US en-US Awa Dembele þ. ..................................................... en-US17en-US en-US Xidao Deng þ. .......................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Christian DiBiase þ. .................................................. en-US5en-US en-US Joseph DiGerolamo þ. .......................................... en-US14en-US en-US Dylan DiGrazia þ. ...................................................... en-US9en-US en-US Hiruni Dodangoda þ. ............................................ en-US24en-US en-US Emily Dolan þ. ......................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Breck Donohue þ. .................................................. en-US10en-US en-US Eva Dotyen-US ..................................................................en-US 9en-US en-US Kristie Drzewiecki þ. ................................................ en-US5en-US en-US Lyta Duselen-US .............................................................en-US 26en-US E þ en-USChristopher Eastman þ. ....................................... en-US11en-US en-US Alexander Ehrenberg þ. ...................................... en-US18en-US en-US Jeremy Eldred þ. ..................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Maria Elena þ. ............................................................ en-US7en-US en-US Kayla Elfers þ. ........................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Shay Elster þ. ............................................................ en-US26en-US en-US Carley Estep þ. ......................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Amanda Estrella þ. ................................................. en-US26en-US en-US Nicole Evans þ. ........................................................ en-US18en-US F þ en-USLi Fang þ. ................................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Hamdi Farah þ. ........................................................ en-US15en-US en-US Blake Farnham þ. .................................................... en-US13en-US en-US Adam Fay þ. .............................................................. en-US26en-US en-US Allison Feely þ. .......................................................... en-US4en-US en-US Emily Fingar þ. .................................................... en-US8en-US , en-US24en-US en-US Tiany Flores þ. ......................................................... en-US4en-US en-US Richard Frieman þ. ................................................. en-US24en-US en-US Wyatt Fulton þ. ....................................................... en-US18en-US G þ en-USLindsey Gancasz þ. .................................................. en-US4en-US en-US Ryan Gannon þ. ........................................................ en-US4en-US en-US Alexander Gault-Plate þ. .................................... en-US15en-US en-US Tatyanna Gay þ. ...................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Fadi Gaye þ. .............................................................. en-US17en-US en-US Christopher Gayvert þ. ........................................... en-US7en-US en-US Shawn Geary þ. ....................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Dylan Genthner þ. ................................................. en-US25en-US en-US John Gillies þ. ........................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Robert Giumarra þ. ................................................ en-US22en-US en-US Nathaniel Goldstein þ. ........................................... en-US4en-US en-US Sean Goodhueen-US ....................................................en-US25en-US en-USPiper Goodleaf þ. ..................................................... en-US8en-US en-US Emily Gordon þ. ...................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Kate Gordon þ. ................................................. en-US15en-US , en-US25en-US en-US Jenna Gotte þ. .................................................... en-US6en-US , en-US25en-US en-US Sarah Gray þ. ............................................................ en-US10en-US en-US Samuel Gregory þ. ................................................. en-US26en-US en-US Anastasia Grimando þ. ......................................... en-US22en-US en-US James Guidi þ. .................................................. en-US13en-US , en-US25en-US en-US Lauren Guilds þ. ...................................................... en-US16en-US en-US George Gurgis þ. ...................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Tyler Guy þ. ............................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Amanda Gydesen þ. .............................................. en-US22en-US H þ en-USDwan Hameed þ. ............................................ en-US22en-US, en-US26en-US en-US Colin Harrington þ. ................................................ en-US24en-US en-US Katherine Hartzell þ. ...................................... en-US22en-US, en-US23en-US en-US Garrett Hausman þ. ............................................... en-US25en-US en-US Alexandra Hayes þ. ................................................ en-US25en-US en-US Pruthuvi Heenatigala þ. ....................................... en-US25en-US en-US David Hennigan þ. ................................................. en-US25en-US en-US Karla Hernandez-Pazen-US ..........................................en-US 4en-US en-US Muhammadzohir Hidoyatov þ. ......................... en-US24en-US en-US Abigail Hines þ. ....................................................... en-US22en-US en-US David Hite þ. ............................................................ en-US10en-US en-US James Hough þ. ...................................................... en-US23en-US en-US Deborah Howard þ. ............................................... en-US12en-US en-US Scott Howe þ. .......................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Sien Hu þ. .................................................................. en-US20en-US en-US Tyler Hughes þ. ....................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Joshua Hull þ. .......................................................... en-US19en-US en-US Emma Hulsing þ. .................................................... en-US17en-US en-US Jillian Hunt þ. ........................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Kathryn Hunt þ. ................................................. en-US5en-US , en-US24en-US en-US Mercedes Hunt þ. ................................................... en-US16en-US en-US Steven Hust þ. ......................................................... en-US13en-US I þ en-USIan Insley þ. ............................................................... en-US24en-US J þ en-USDakota Jackson þ. .................................................... en-US9en-US en-US Renasha James þ. ..................................................... en-US7en-US en-US Rachel Janishen-US .......................................................en-US 15en-US en-US Samantha Jenks þ. ................................................. en-US20en-US en-US Spencer Johnson þ. ............................................... en-US21en-US en-US Mariah Johst þ. ........................................................ en-US19en-US en-US Noah Jones þ. .......................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Malik Jones þ. ............................................................ en-US9en-US K þ en-USAli Khan þ. ............................................................ en-US6en-US , en-US25en-US en-US Ashish Kharka þ. ..................................................... en-US14en-US en-US Sarah King þ. ............................................................ en-US24en-US en-US Michael Kirsch þ. ...................................................... en-US8en-US en-US Adam Kuhn þ. ............................................................ en-US5en-US en-US Derek Kuhn þ. ............................................................ en-US6en-US en-US Koty Kurtzen-US ...............................................................en-US 5en-US

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28 en-US L en-USMatthew Larkin þ. .................................................. en-US26en-US en-US Trieu Le þ. ............................................................ en-US17en-US , en-US18en-US en-US Jacob Lewis þ. ......................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Kerisha Lewis þ. ...................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Nicole Licourten-US ........................................................en-US 4en-US en-US Guanghui Liu þ. ...................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Zoraida Lopez þ. ................................... .................. en-US16en-US en-US Jourdan Lord þ. ................................... .................... en-US25en-US en-US M en-USChristopher Maddaloni þ. ................................... en-US15en-US en-US Justine Mahler þ. .................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Joseph Maier þ. ....................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Toby Malone þ. ................................................ en-US22en-US, en-US23en-US en-US Paola Marn þ. .......................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Kenneth Marshall þ. ....................................... en-US12en-US , en-US13en-US en-US Sarah Mason þ. ........................................................ en-US25en-US en-US Patrick Mathis þ. .............................................. en-US22en-US, en-US23en-US en-US Richard McCabe þ. ................................................. en-US15en-US en-US Precise Mcgirt þ. ..................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Kyle Meade þ. .......................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Brett Meerdink þ. ................................................... en-US17en-US en-US Linden Merrill þ. .................................. ................... en-US21en-US en-US Alexis Miller þ. ......................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Margaret Miller þ. ..................................................... en-US8en-US en-US Claire Millington þ. ................................................ en-US25en-US en-US Ashlee Moore þ. ..................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Delani Morganen-US ....................................................en-US 10en-US en-US Gabrielle Moro þ. ................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Philip Mosher þ. ........................................................ en-US6en-US en-US Hayley Mosher þ. .................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Tianna Moxley þ. ............................................. en-US21en-US , en-US26en-US en-US N en-USSeth Nesbitten-US .........................................................en-US 22en-US en-US Allen Nguyen þ. ...................................................... en-US14en-US en-US Gigi Niu þ. ................................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Rita Ntim-Gyakari þ. ....................................... en-US15en-US , en-US25en-US en-US P en-USSayuri Pacheco þ. ................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Ryan Parrish þ. ......................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Anthony Pasquarella þ. ........................................ en-US21en-US en-US Ryan Paternoster þ. ................................................. en-US4en-US en-US Lillian Pavord þ. ....................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Miles Petersen þ. ...................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Rudolph Petter þ. ................................................... en-US13en-US en-US Bailey Phelps þ. ....................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Evan Piccolo þ. ........................................................ en-US22en-US en-US Laura Piekunka þ. ................................... ................ en-US16en-US en-US Selena Piero þ. ...................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Edward Pisacaneen-US ................................................en-US 11en-US en-US Kathryn Ploss þ. ...................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Anthony Pompa þ. ................................................... en-US9en-US en-US Jason Powers þ. ...................................................... en-US16en-US en-US Oliver Pratt þ. ........................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Leticia Preciado þ. .................................................. en-US24en-US en-US Q en-USMargaret Queen þ. ................................................ en-US10en-US en-US R en-USRitu Radhakrishnan þ. .......................................... en-US12en-US en-US Seamus Raia þ. ........................................................ en-US10en-US en-US Tania Ramalho þ. .................................................... en-US13en-US en-US Meghan Ransford þ. .............................................. en-US26en-US en-US Taylor Rechichi þ. .................................. ................. en-US10en-US en-US Francesca Rescigno þ. ............................................ en-US5en-US en-US Brayan Reyes þ. ....................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Theo Rhodes þ. ....................................................... en-US19en-US en-US Samara Rice þ. .................................. ... en-US19en-US , en-US20en-US , en-US21en-US , en-US26en-US en-US Kimberly Rice þ. ...................................................... en-US13en-US en-US Dawson Rieman þ. ................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Alexandra Rivera þ. ........................................ en-US20en-US , en-US26en-US en-US Robert Robbins þ. .................................. ................ en-US10en-US en-US Kelsey Roberts þ. .................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Jenn Robilotto þ. .................................................... en-US18en-US en-US Giovanni Rodriguez þ. .......................................... en-US22en-US en-US Nicole Rose þ. .......................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Ian Rowe þ. ............................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Meghan Rowe þ. .................................. .................. en-US26en-US en-US S en-USDevin Sagendorf þ. ............................................... en-US25en-US en-US Regan Saltzer þ. ...................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Jessica Sandy þ. ........................................................ en-US5en-US en-US Manoj Sehan Santhakumar þ. .......................... en-US25en-US en-US Deanna Santiago þ. ............................................... en-US25en-US en-US Andrew Saunders þ. .............................................. en-US21en-US en-US Daria Savitskaia þ. .................................................. en-US25en-US en-US Rebecca Sawler þ. .................................................. en-US21en-US en-US Courtney Sayre þ. ................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Jonathan Schmidt þ. ............................................. en-US25en-US en-US Patrick Schultz þ. .................................................... en-US16en-US en-US Autumn Schunk þ. ................................................. en-US16en-US en-US Michael Scott þ. ...................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Chelsie Scott þ. ......................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Morgan Scott þ. ...................................................... en-US10en-US en-US Justin Searles þ. ...................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Anne Seichepin þ. .................................................. en-US15en-US en-US Stenie Senquiz þ. ................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Emily Schaer þ. ..................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Eyal Shamban þ. ..................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Tori Shaw þ. ................................................................ en-US5en-US en-US Sam Shebert þ. ........................................................ en-US15en-US en-US Caroline Sheldon þ. ............................................... en-US24en-US en-US Galappaththige Binura Samodya Silva þ. ..... en-US13en-US en-US Rachel Simizon þ. ................................................... en-US19en-US en-US Rahsone Simpsonen-US ................................................en-US 5en-US en-US Cassandra Slough þ. ............................................. en-US22en-US en-US Madelyn Smith þ. ..................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Michael Smith þ. ..................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Dylan Smith þ. ......................................................... en-US17en-US en-US Shannon Soccocio þ. ............................................ en-US11en-US en-US Matthew Sodano þ. ............................................... en-US18en-US en-US Mary Sorensen þ. ................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Santiago Soto þ. ..................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Logan Sperano þ. ................................................... en-US17en-US en-US Kimberlynn Sprague þ. .......................................... en-US9en-US en-US Caleb Stahl þ. ........................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Caitlyn Stearnsen-US ....................................................en-US 24en-US en-US Jada Sterling þ. ........................................................ en-US10en-US en-US Skyler Stisser þ. ....................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Shannon Stone þ. ................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Grace Strojny þ. ....................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Justin Stroup þ. ....................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Alec Suits þ. .............................................................. en-US15en-US en-USKarissa Sumell þ. ..................................................... en-US24en-US en-US Nicholas Sweet þ. ................................................... en-US23en-US en-US Eldad Sylvestre þ. ..................................................... en-US7en-US en-US T en-USLillian Talmageen-US ....................................................en-US 16en-US en-US Abhishek Thapa þ. ................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Oshadhi Theshan þ. .............................................. en-US25en-US en-US Nicole Thomas þ. .................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Stephen Thompson þ. .......................................... en-US26en-US en-US Julia Tilley þ. ................................... .......................... en-US10en-US en-US Stephanie Timpe þ. ............................................... en-US11en-US en-US Roselyn Tofa þ. ........................................................ en-US25en-US en-US Tyler Toomey þ. ....................................................... en-US18en-US en-US Jasmine Tovar þ. ....................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Taylor Trainor þ. ...................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Dakota Trejo þ. ........................................................ en-US19en-US en-US U en-USHaley Uitvlugt þ. ....................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Michelle Urman þ. .................................................... en-US6en-US en-US V en-USEthan Van Blommestein þ. ................................. en-US14en-US en-US Nicolas Van Kempen þ. ........................................ en-US16en-US en-US Eusebio Omar van Reenen þ. ............................ en-US21en-US en-US Mackenzie VanHorn þ. ......................................... en-US22en-US en-US Francis Venne þ. ...................................................... en-US14en-US en-US Sabrina Ventrano þ. ............................................... en-US10en-US en-US W en-USEmily Wagner þ. ................................... .................. en-US15en-US en-US Thomas Waizenegger þ. ...................................... en-US25en-US en-US Sydney Waloven þ. ................................................ en-US24en-US en-US Timothy Walrath þ. ................................................ en-US15en-US en-US Maren Walsh þ. ....................................................... en-US22en-US en-US Xiaochen Wang þ. .................................................. en-US12en-US en-US Gabriel Warner þ. .................................. ................. en-US16en-US en-US Shane’ Weir þ. .......................................................... en-US15en-US en-US Jiu Wen þ. .................................................................. en-US10en-US en-US Lauren Wensleyen-US ..................................................en-US 13en-US en-US Ian White þ. .............................................................. en-US16en-US en-US Benjamin Wilson þ. ................................................ en-US19en-US en-US Morgan Wolanin þ. .................................................. en-US9en-US en-US Rebecca Wol þ. ....................................................... en-US6en-US en-US Karen Wolford þ. .................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Veronica Wright þ. .................................. ............... en-US24en-US en-US Lauren Wright þ. ..................................................... en-US26en-US en-US Y en-USKa Ying Chan þ. ....................................................... en-US25en-US en-US Z en-USNajah Zaaeed þ. ...................................................... en-US25en-US en-US John Zammiello þ. ................................................. en-US25en-US en-US Carolyn Zeitz þ. ......................................................... en-US5en-US en-US Huiyi Zhang þ. ......................................................... en-US21en-US en-US Waley Zhang þ. ....................................................... en-US25

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29 en-USHistory of Questen-USIn 1979, The Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee (SCAC), then en-US known as the Faculty Research Committee (FRC), wanted to develop en-US ways to encourage more research on campus. One suggestion was to en-US have a Scholarly Activities at Oswego Conference Day, where faculty en-US could present their research to the campus community. Dr. Helen Daly en-US organized the day and it was decided to call it “Quest” in honor of en-US the College’s “quest for knowledge”. Quest had an impressive 77 en-US presentations that rst year.en-US In 1982, the administration knew this would be a successful annual en-US program and canceled classes for the rst time to bring additional focus en-US to the event. In 1996, Quest was dedicated to the memory of Dr. Daly, en-US who died in 1995, because she took the concept of Quest and turned en-US it into an annual tradition that celebrates campus-wide scholarly and en-US creative activity.en-US Today Quest is a mix of students, faculty, staff and campus-wide en-US presentations with more than 350 participants.

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thank you for helping to make this day possible — We are grateful for the support from the Ofce of the Provost and the staff and volunteers from the Division of Graduate Studies, Scholarly and Creative Activity Committee, Departmental Quest representatives and Peneld Library that helped bring this event to life. Special thanks to the Quest 2020 Planning Committee:Kristen C. Eichhorn, Dean, Graduate Studies Laura Spenceley, Associate Dean, Graduate Studies Shana Vandish, Graduate Studies Kelly Dolan, MBA, Graduate Student Tiphanie Gonzalez, Counseling and Psychological Services Matthew Baker, Chemistry Marybeth DeGroot, Design and Print Services Sarah Weisman, Peneld Library Zachary Vickery, College Archivist Librarian Kathryn Johns-Masten, Special Collections and Systems Librarian